La Grande Bretèche Summary

Summary (Comprehensive Guide to Short Stories, Critical Edition)

The frame narrator, Dr. Horace Bianchon, begins his story with a lengthy description of a dilapidated residence called La Grande Bretèche, which he discovered while practicing medicine in Vendôme. Although the residence is not ancient, Bianchon speaks of it as if it were an archaeological ruin—one whose mysterious power of attraction is so strong that he regularly scales its garden walls to contemplate the unknown catastrophe that caused it to collapse into such ruins. Bianchon continues to visit its garden in secret until, one day, he receives a call from Mr. Regnault, an attorney and executor of the estate, who forbids him to trespass on its grounds. Bianchon agrees to stop his clandestine visits but implores Regnault to tell him what he knows about the place’s catastrophic decline.

Regnault explains how Mrs. de Merret, the owner of the estate, called him late one night to make him the legal custodian of her estate. Curiously, the principal task that she assigned him was to ensure that the place would remain uninhabited and untouched for fifty years after her death. Regnault also passes along other facts about Mr. and Mrs. de Merret’s “catastrophic” separation; Mr. Merret’s subsequent fall into decadence in Paris; and Mrs. de Merret’s return to her native Chateau de Merret, where she withered away to a ghostlike existence. She eventually died clutching an ebony crucifix and uttering these cryptic last words: “Oh! my God!”

Mrs. Lepas, the nosy owner of the Vendôme inn in which Bianchon is staying, picks up the story where Regnault...

(The entire section is 646 words.)