Study Guide

Hanging Fire

by Audre Lorde

Hanging Fire Themes

Themes and Meanings (Critical Guide to Poetry for Students)

In “Hanging Fire” Lorde’s focus is on several issues that confront the teenager within the poem and affect teenagers in the extended world: the preoccupation with death, the problem of living in a sexist society, and the fear of isolation within the home. Throughout the entire poem the teenager is preoccupied with death and dying. In the first stanza she frets, “what if I die/ before morning.” In the second stanza she worries, “suppose I die before graduation.” In the final stanza she is troubled: “will I live long enough/ to grow up.” Lorde makes the reader aware of the fact that, like the persona within the poem, some teenagers are preoccupied with thoughts of death.

As a black feminist Lorde believed that she must combat sexism at all levels and at all times, and she does so in this poem. The fact that the young girl in the poem has not become a part of the “Math Team” despite the fact that her grades were higher than those of the male who was selected, is an indictment of the sexist attitudes of society in general and the school system in particular. Society teaches that an individual, male or female, should be evaluated on his or her merit. Yet the reality is that sexism exists. Lorde suggests that while such behavior is painful for adults, it is extremely traumatic to the young. What seems to be worse than the sexist treatment, however, is the fact that no one deplores the act or is concerned about the effects it might have on...

(The entire section is 469 words.)