Hands Around Themes

Themes and Meanings (Survey of Dramatic Literature)

Arthur Schnitzler had an early career as a physician, and though he was not a psychiatrist, he was admired by Sigmund Freud for his poetic anticipation of some of the psychoanalyst’s clinical findings. A diagnostician rather than a therapist, he concerns himself more with the description of psychic structures than with a search for their origins. In Hands Around, Schnitzler presents a typology of amorous relationships, exploring the dark power of sexuality, which draws all characters into its vortex, and the sway of Eros, which levels all social and economic distinctions. Depicting a cross section of Viennese society at the turn of the twentieth century, the playwright questions the moral foundations of that decaying society and lays bare a psychological and social malaise within it as he exposes the exploitation of women by men, the weaker by the more powerful, and the failures by the successful. The notorious double standard has led to a socially sanctioned differentiation between love and lust. Schnitzler excoriates a society that regards its empty, mendacious rituals as normal and inevitable. The ancient Roman adage Penis erectus non habet conscientiam applies here: A lustful man will stoop to almost any strategy of seduction.

Eschewing any plot or character development in the conventional sense, Schnitzler is less interested in the sex act as such than in what leads up to it and what transpires in its aftermath. Intercourse is not...

(The entire section is 481 words.)