Study Guide

The Great Santini

by Pat Conroy

The Great Santini Summary

Summary (Critical Survey of Literature for Students)

Bull Meecham is a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps who routinely declares himself the best fighter pilot alive. He is stationed at the Ravenel Marine Air Base in South Carolina. He moves to Ravenel with his family, Lillian, a southern aristocrat; seventeen-year-old Ben, their athletic oldest son; sixteen-year-old Mary Anne, their brilliant yet acerbic daughter; and Karen and Matt, who strive like their older siblings to earn their father’s approval while dodging his frequent flights of temper.

Bombastic and flamboyant, Bull asks no quarter and gives none. He often threatens his children with physical violence and occasionally makes good on his threats. Bull is fond of referring to himself in the third person at times, calling himself the Great Santini and requiring his children to recite a litany of his praises. Despite his arrogance and swagger, he makes friends with locals at Hobie’s Diner and with his senior sergeant and the others under his command. Bull establishes control over the 367th Marine Squadron with leadership qualities that earn the respect and loyalty of his men. At the same time, he has a temper that turns on his children, particularly Ben.

Settling into life in Ravenel is not as easy as it could be for Bull or the family. His commanding officer, Colonel Varney, is also his enemy, a hatred that goes back to the time when they were young lieutenants. To ensure the success of his new squadron, Bull will have to swallow more pride than he finds palatable.

Early in the school year, daughter Mary Anne forces her brother Ben to intercede in a schoolyard brawl on behalf of Ben’s friend, Sammy Wertzberger, who is being picked on by the local delinquent, Red Pettus. Red actually pulls a knife on Ben, and although Ben gets the better of him, the Pettus family will remain his enemy.

In his first meeting with the officers and pilots of his new squadron, Bull explains in typical humorous hyperbole...

(The entire section is 804 words.)