Erskine Childers Biography


(Masterpieces of Fiction, Detective and Mystery Edition)

Erskine Childers was born Robert Erskine Childers in London on June 25, 1870, the second son of Robert Caesar Childers, a distinguished English scholar of East Indian languages, and Anna Mary Barton, daughter of an Irish landed family from Glendalough, County Wicklow, Ireland. The early death of Childers’s father resulted in the removal of the family from England to the Barton family’s home in Ireland, and it was there that Erskine Childers was reared and ultimately found his nationality. He was educated in a private school in England and at Trinity College, Cambridge University. After receiving his bachelor’s degree in 1893, he was appointed a clerk in the House of Commons, serving there from 1895 until he resigned in 1910 to devote his efforts to achieving Home Rule for Ireland.

In 1900, Childers joined a volunteer company and served in action in the war against the Boers in South Africa. The daily letters sent to his sisters and relations, recording his impressions of the war as he was experiencing it, were edited by them and published without his knowledge as a surprise on his return (1900). The success of this volume of correspondence with the public led to Childers’s second literary work, a history of the military unit in which he served (1903), and ultimately a volume in the London Times’s history of the Boer Wars (1907).

During the long parliamentary recesses, Childers had spent his free time sailing a small thirty-foot yacht in the Baltic and North Seas and the English Channel. He had first learned to love the sea as a boy in Ireland, and he was to use his knowledge of these waters in July, 1914, to smuggle a large shipment of arms and ammunition from a German supply ship off the Belgian...

(The entire section is 712 words.)