Critical Evaluation

Émile Zola began as a literary Romantic and an idealist. In his youth, he wrote fairy tales and dreamed of perfect beauty and perfect love. The poverty he experienced early in life, and the general European literary climate, however, brought him to try to picture an imperfect but real “corner of nature.”

Earth, the fifteenth volume of the Rougon-Macquarts series, is Zola’s horrifying vision of the French peasantry before the Franco-Prussian War. In the relationships between Fouan and his family, Zola consciously adopted the theme of William Shakespeare’s King Lear (pr. c. 1605-1606, pb. 1608), although the realistic detail with which Fouan is drawn includes none of the nobility of Shakespeare’s king. Zola’s introduction of Rabelaisian humor in the character Jésus-Christ was an innovation in literary realism. The earth itself dominates the novel, and its beauty and its indifference contrast vividly with the peasants’ passionate absorption in possessing the land and with the crimes they commit in order to do so.

A magnificent example of Zola’s groping for the authentic details in life, Earth can be best understood when placed in the literary context of realism and naturalism. Literary realism developed in the nineteenth century partly as a response to the conditions of modern society. It stressed fidelity to the facts of everyday existence. Scenes, characters, motives, and conflicts were presumably drawn from experiences in life rather than from dreams of other worlds or of the supernatural. Within the realist tradition are distinct and coherent groupings—naturalism is one of them—but it is easier to place a work such as Earth in the naturalist tradition than it is to define literary naturalism. In general, however, for the purposes of examining Earth, two basic points can be established: Naturalism attempts to portray the actual and significant details of life and especially (though not exclusively) the life of poor and working people, and naturalism most often attempts to uncover those forces in the environment and in the genetic makeup of the individual that determine the course of life.

Earth tries to give an accurate picture of French rural life in the 1860’s. This picture is not merely a general account but a brilliantly detailed canvas that conveys the humanity and the density of rural life. The basis of the action of the novel is the division of an old man’s land. Much of the novel, therefore, describes the unending, vicious, implacable hatreds and the unyielding tensions that emerge within the farmer’s family. Domestic life is described through the conversations, the cooking and cleaning utensils, the jealous glances, and the dirt, cobwebs, and small, damp rooms of the peasant households. The smells of the fields, the manure, the sweat,...

(The entire section is 1168 words.)