The Diary of a Young Girl Essay - Critical Essays

Anne Frank

Masterpieces of Women's Literature The Diary of a Young Girl Analysis

Young children often have imaginary friends. As they mature, they replace these spectral companions with real playmates. Anne Frank, after she followed her family into hiding, never enjoyed this luxury. Her diary became her friend, her retreat from a microcosm imposed upon her and the seven other Jews imprisoned in the loft because of Hitler’s master plan of genocide against Jews and other groups. Even before the Franks entered the loft, Anne had named her diary “Kitty.” The day that she received the diary, she wrote that she expected great support from it because she would use it to confide things that she had never been able to tell anyone she had known.

As the diary begins, the young girl writes about herself more than about others, but her scope broadens. As the diary continues, the reader encounters a bright, vibrant adolescent growing into womanhood; in the face of what eventually happens to Anne, the coming-of-age takes on an almost mocking tone for the reader.

Few can read this diary as Anne Frank wrote it. She, unlike her readers, was innocent of the outcome of her family’s twenty-five-month exile. Her last entry, an introspective, self-analytical assessment, is dated August 1, 1944. The dreaded Grüne Polizei made its raid on the Franks’ loft on August 4. By the end of the following March, all of the Franks except Otto were dead. Margot succumbed to typhus at the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, probably in early March, 1945. The same illness killed Anne a week or two later.

No matter how much detachment readers bring to The Diary of a Young Girl, any reading of it is inevitably overshadowed by the specter of death that hung over Jews in Hitler’s Germany and the satellites that it occupied. The book and the subsequent film and stage versions tweak the consciences of those exposed to the story.

Writing with no audience in...

(The entire section is 780 words.)