The Daughters of Cain

THE DAUGHTERS OF CAIN is the eleventh Inspector Morse mystery written by Colin Dexter. The award-winning mystery writer first introduced Chief Inspector Morse in 1975 with LAST BUS TO WOODSTOCK. The Inspector Morse series has earned critical acclaim and has become increasingly popular with the reading public with each new installment. The popularity of the series can be directly attributed to the crusty, yet lovable, Chief Inspector Morse. He is an educated man who appreciates the arts, especially opera. His abrasive temperament does not endear him to everyone, but underneath the gruff exterior is a kind soul who doggedly believes in justice. Morse also has a fondness for beer and smoking, both of which have taken their toll on his general health. Although he is attracted to women, Morse is a complete failure when it comes to lasting relationships. Sergeant Lewis serves as a perfect foil to Morse. Although lacking a university education to compare with that of Morse, Lewis is a fine detective in his own right. Whereas Morse seems to rely on intuition to put the pieces of a case together, Lewis is more methodical and does not jump to wild conclusions.

In THE DAUGHTERS OF CAIN, an Oxford University don named Felix McClure is stabbed to death. The evidence leads Morse to believe that a one-time employee at Oxford, Edward Brooks, is the murderer. Unfortunately, the case becomes complicated when Brooks himself turns up dead, having been murdered with the same knife that killed McClure. The author constructs a labyrinth of false leads, and only the most attentive reader will be able to stay up with Morse. As in all richly textured mysteries, nothing is as simple as it looks on first glance. THE DAUGHTERS OF CAIN is a gripping and literate tale that will surely add to the growing number of fans of the Inspector Morse series.