The Courtship of Miles Standish Summary

Summary (Masterpieces of American Literature)

The Courtship of Miles Standish is another historical narrative poem; this time Longfellow turns to the Pilgrims of Plymouth Plantation for his material, and he once more softens the harshness of his subject and makes it accessible to his audience. The meter he chose for the poem is dactylic hexameter, but it has none of the monotony of Evangeline; it is very loosely structured and at times seems on the edge of prose. It also has none of the heroic treatment of Evangeline or The Song of Hiawatha. It is really a romantic drama, not an imitation of Greek or Finnish epic.

The poem begins with a description of Miles Standish as “strongly built and athletic,/ Broad in the shoulders, deep-chested, with muscles and sinews of iron.” John Alden is not described in the same detail, but it is clear that he is the opposite of Miles Standish. Alden is no soldier but is called a scholar. Standish is a man of few words, while Alden is a closet poet hymning the name of Priscilla. The conflict of the tale is quickly brought out. Miles Standish has lost his wife and uses biblical authority rather than personal passion to justify his search for a new bride. She is to be Priscilla Mullins.

Standish does not have the words to woo a maiden, however, so he turns to Alden. Alden’s conflict is quickly resolved: “The name of friendship is sacred;/ What you demand in that name, I have not the power to deny you!” His divided feelings emerge, however, love contends with friendship, and he wonders if he must “relinquish” the joys of love. He resolves the dilemma by seeing his love as vanity; “I have worshipped too much the heart’s desire and devices.” Religious authority prevails.

Alden’s delivery of Standish’s proposal to Priscilla is surprisingly blunt. There is no poetic prologue or honeyed words, merely the facts of the case. “So I have come to you now, with an offer and proffer of marriage! Made by a good man and true, Miles Standish the Captain of Plymouth.” Priscilla replies directly: “Why does he not come himself, and take the trouble to woo me?” She is not the submissive Minnehaha or the dutiful Evangeline but an independent and witty woman. She takes the failure of Standish...

(The entire section is 921 words.)