Black Is My Favorite Color Summary

Summary (Comprehensive Guide to Short Stories, Critical Edition)

Nat Lime, a Jewish liquor dealer in Harlem, is searching for understanding, trying to explain his attraction to African Americans. He begins his monologue by describing his cleaning woman, the kind but puzzling Charity Quietness. He addresses an imaginary audience from his Brooklyn three-room apartment, where he has lived alone since his mother died. On his day off from his liquor store, he eats lunch in his kitchen while his black maid eats in the bathroom.

Although Nat jokes about this absurdity, he is hurt by Charity’s refusal to join him and says that the rejection is her choice. He has offered to let her eat in the kitchen alone, but she prefers lunching in the bathroom. On an earlier occasion she accepted his offer but could not finish her meal. For nearly two years now she has eaten alone in the bathroom. Anticipating his audience’s objections to this point, Nat says, “If there’s a ghetto, I’m the one that’s in it.” As a Jew he has a historical right to define the ghetto, even though his joke implies a more contemporary definition of the word: the urban areas containing large concentrations of minorities.

With Charity, as with the other black people, Nat’s attempt to develop an individual relationship fails, leading him to consider contemporary racial issues. His characteristic response to anything is to analyze it, and he tries to place his personal experiences within a larger context. In his defense, he offers two illustrations of his “fate with colored people.” The first is the memory of his attempt to befriend Buster, a twelve-year-old black boy whose neighborhood bordered Nat’s in prewar Brooklyn. Both were poor. Nat’s father, a garment worker, died when Nat was only thirteen, and his mother sold paper bags on the street until she was...

(The entire section is 736 words.)

Black Is My Favorite Color Summary

Charity Quietness
"Black Is My Favorite Color'' starts out with a description by Nat Lime, the narrator, of his cleaning lady,...

(The entire section is 1079 words.)