Themes and Meanings

(Critical Guide to Poetry for Students)

“The Basket-Maker,” like many other poems about artistic creation, makes a significant statement about its narrator’s attitude toward his own craft. The speaker’s self-conscious allusion to his own creative process as he repeats and mulls over a phrase from earlier in the poem draws the reader’s attention to the parallels between the speaker and the basket-weaver. The craftsman’s skill is ancient in origin, like the Bronze Age artifacts revealed by the receding lake waters, but it requires the poet’s skill to find the poem in the experience. The friend of the poet, with his knowledge of historical lore, is able to appreciate the arm-rings, the quern, the boar-tusk pendants, and the piece of amber, but only the poet recognizes the treasure on which these other treasures rest: the “woven hazel twigs,” which provide historical validation of the basket-maker’s craft. The poet’s ability to appreciate the basket-maker’s art, past and present, is precisely what makes him an artist in his own right.

While the themes of artistic creation and the link between the past and the present are universal, the setting of “The Basket-Maker” is quite specific, and consideration of the poem in that context provides insight into another layer of meaning. The poem is explicitly set in a marketplace, and it can be gathered from the reference to Counties Kerry and Galway that the marketplace is located in the rural west of Ireland. As the poem...

(The entire section is 470 words.)