Badger Themes

Themes and Meanings (Critical Guide to Poetry for Students)

The main subject of “Badger” is the relationship of the wild animal to the humans who bait and tame it. What is the reader to make of the townspeople’s cruelty to the badger? One response to the poem would be to condemn the badger-baiters as ignorant sadists, but Clare’s avoidance of moral judgment suggests that he would not necessarily agree with this view. Although Clare would not have been aware of Charles Darwin’s theory of natural selection, he understood the concept of survival of the fittest from observing animal behavior in the fields near Helpston. For example, in his natural history notes, Clare carefully describes how green beetles will attack a large moth, devour part of it, and drag the moth’s corpse to their hole. There is the same sense of detachment in “Badger”; Clare never expresses pity for the badger nor outrage against the townspeople. In fact, the townspeople and the badger resemble each other in their ferocity—one might even say that in the poem the animal and his tormentors become indistinguishable.

Despite Clare’s detachment, the poem does seem to imply that the badger is being cruelly mistreated—certainly the odds, one small badger versus a whole town of dogs and rock-throwing and cudgel-wielding people, do not seem even remotely fair. Thus some readers of the poem consider the baited badger as a victim of the townspeople’s capricious exercise of power over a vulnerable creature and, by extension, a...

(The entire section is 506 words.)