Characters Discussed

(Great Characters in Literature)

Amadís de Gaul

Amadís de Gaul (ah-mah-DEES duh gawl), the natural son of King Perion of Gaul and Elisena, daughter of King Garinter of Lesser Britain. To be worthy of his beloved, Oriana, the daughter of the king of England, and to win her hand, he becomes a knight and passes through many brave adventures.

King Perión of Gaul

King Perión of Gaul (pehr-ee-OHN), the father of Amadís de Gaul.

Princess Elisena

Princess Elisena (eh-lee-SEHN-nah), the mother of Amadís de Gaul.


Galaor (gah-lah-OHR), the brother of Amadís de Gaul.


Lisuarte (lee-SWAHR-teh), the king of England and the father of Oriana.


Brisena (bree-SEH-nah), the queen of England and the mother of Oriana.


Oriana (ohr-ee-AH-nah), the daughter of King Lisuarte and Queen Brisena. She is loved by Amadís de Gaul, who wins her hand after many knightly adventures.


Urganda (ewr-GAHN-dah), an enchantress, the protector of Amadís de Gaul.


Arcalaus (ahr-kah-LOWS), a wicked magician.

King Garinter

King Garinter (gah-reen-TEHR), the grandfather of Amadís de Gaul.


Darioleta (dahr-ee-oh-LEH-tah), Elisena’s attendant. She hides the infant Amadís de Gaul, along with his father’s ring, in an ark and sets him afloat.


Gandales (gahn-DAH-lehs), a knight who finds Amadís de Gaul in the sea and rears him.


Gandalín (gahn-dahl-EEN), the son of Gandales.


Languines (lahn-GWEEN-ehs), the king of Scotland, who takes Amadís de Gaul to his court.


Abies (AH-bee-ehs), the king of Ireland and the enemy of King Perion.


Galpano (gahl-PAH-noh), a haughty robber who is overcome by Amadís de Gaul.


Barsinan (bahr-SEE-nahn), a traitor to King Lisuarte.


Apolidón (ah-pohl-lee-DOHN), the son of the king of Greece.

King Aravigo

King Aravigo (ah-rah-VEE-goh), an enemy of King Lisuarte and Amadís de Gaul.


Gasquilán (gahs-kee-LAHN), the king of Sweden, who is overthrown in single combat by Amadís de Gaul.


Esplandián (ehs-plahn-dee-AHN), a messenger.

Amadís of Gaul Bibliography

(Great Characters in Literature)

Green, Otis H. Spain and the Western Tradition. 4 vols. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1963. A discussion of Amadís of Gaul in the context of the mythology of courtly love appears in volume 1 on pages 104-111.

Moorcock, Michael. Wizardry and Wild Romance: A Study of Epic Fantasy. London: Victor Gollancz, 1987. Chapter 1 discusses Amadís of Gaul as the primary ancestor of the modern genre of fantasy.

Northup, George Tyler. An Introduction to Spanish Literature. 3d ed., revised by Nicholson B. Adams. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1960. Describes the origins of chivalric romance, discussing the authorship and influence of Amadís of Gaul.

Place, Edwin B., and Herber C. Behm. Amadís of Gaul: A Romance of Chivalry of the Fourteenth Century Presumably First Written in Spanish. 2 vols. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1974. A full English translation of the work from the earliest available source; the introduction offers a brief history of the text.

Williams, Grace S. “The Amadís Question.” Revue Hispanique 21 (1909): 1-167. A comprehensive discussion of the origins of the story and its various versions.