A Little More About Me Summary

Synopsis

Pam Houston's collection of essays, A Little More About Me (2000), provides readers with the true story behind the author's two very popular collections of short stories, Cowboys Are My Weakness (1993) and Waltzing the Cat (1995). In Houston's creative writing, readers are taken on adventurous treks as they view the narrator's actions as if watching a movie. But in A Little More About Me, Houston becomes more reflective, sharing the emotions she felt during those adventures and the relationships she gathered along the way.

Houston talks about her parents, for instance, giving the reader a glimpse into her childhood, which Houston suggests was not a very pleasant or nurturing experience. She claims that she is not ready to completely divulge the terrors of her childhood but hopes to do so someday. As substitution, she offers stories of people whom she used as role models, adults who fought for her rights when she was unable to do so for herself.

She also talks about some of the strongest relationships that she shared and the pain she felt after losing them. She was married and divorced in the course of writing her short story collections. She also lost a close female friend to cancer.

But Houston also reflects on some incredibly positive moments in her life such as the purchase of her Colorado ranch, which helped stabilize her life. And of course, she writes about her horses and dogs, especially Jackson. The last essay of this book is devoted to the renegade Jackson who shared fourteen years with Houston. Then one day, after the dog had gone both blind and deaf, Jackson just disappeared.

Houston talks about birth, too—or at least her thoughts of birth and what it might be like to become a mother. She tried twice. One pregnancy ended in abortion, the other in a miscarriage. She is tormented by both losses, as well as by the thought of how much becoming a mother frightens her.

Writing for the Denver Post, William Porter called Houston the "poster child for a certain kind of take-charge New West Woman." Porter added that both the author and the characters in her stories appear to be made of both "high physical competence" and "emotional vulnerability." And an anonymous reviewer for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette described A Little More About Me, as "part boast, part confession, part travelogue—and almost always entertaining."

Ed. Scott Locklear