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Are you on Twitter? Do you use it in the classroom?Twitter is a lot of fun, I don't...

alexb2's profile pic

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Are you on Twitter? Do you use it in the classroom?

Twitter is a lot of fun, I don't know how it might work as something for the classroom, but it is an easy way to communicate. 

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alexb2's profile pic

Posted (Answer #3)

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Thanks, herappleness. We're following you now!

If we created them, would you be interested in putting an enotes badge on your blog?

herappleness's profile pic

Posted (Answer #2)

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I use Twitter for microbloging with the students. I post a question, and they have all day to respond. I like it because it gives them little space to blabber, and more focus to specifically answer the question. I have a separate account to work with students, but to work with teachers add me at http://twitter.com/herappleness

 

afi80fl's profile pic

Posted (Answer #4)

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This sounds like a really awesome resource, however, I teach in a Title I school.  Without having access at home for microblogging, what else is available for strictly classroom use?  Is it something I could use with my projector for all of the kids to see?  And yes, if I got an account, I'd totally display the e-notes badge! :)

dswain001's profile pic

Posted (Answer #5)

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I am not on Twitter but I am hearing so much about it that I am starting to think that I am being left behind. I first heard about Twitter 6 months ago, but I never bothered to sign up, or even find out what it was about.

I am wondering what it is all about and if it would be something worth incorporating into my classroom. I am all about utilizing technology to supplement traditional methods, but I also think that many teachers use technology as a  crutch for good old-fashioned teaching. Believe it or not, there are some things a website just can't be substitute for.

 

ms-charleston-yawp's profile pic

Posted (Answer #6)

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I'm afraid my knowledge of Twitter right now consists of hearing people talk of "tweets" on the morning programs of Fox News.  I have continually wondered about it, . . . begging myself not to resist yet another aspect of new technology.  Perhaps it's time to research further . . .

herappleness's profile pic

Posted (Answer #7)

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@ Post 3- I would love to put your badge on my blog. Absolutely!

herappleness's profile pic

Posted (Answer #8)

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Today I got a great idea for Twitter for second languages.

Posting a sentence in the foreign language, challenge the students to translate it in correct spelling and grammatical order, semantics etc. By a certain time.

Each hour, post a different sentence. The beauty of it is that, if they use Google translator, or BabelFish, those sites have a high chance of translating with some errors in syntax.

You can go to babelfish ahead of time and write down their version of your sentence so that you know whether someone is cheating.

To make it more interesting, you can make this a voluntary assignment, and you can assign points for as many submissions per student (2 points per tweet)

I think it might make the class motivated. I'm going to try and check.

alexb2's profile pic

Posted (Answer #9)

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I think a good way to understand Twitter would be to do a search for something you're interested in, the more specific the better. For example:

http://twitter.com/search?q=rubric

or 

http://twitter.com/search?q=librarian

amy-lepore's profile pic

Posted (Answer #10)

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I am not a Twitter, but I would love to incorporate this in my classroom as part of a current events perspective.  It could also be helpful in On Demand writing, where we usually give the students a topic and something controversial to consider then set them loose on paper.  I love the ideas posted here.  Thanks for the thought-provoking issue!

travelform's profile pic

Posted (Answer #11)

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http://twitter.com/home  Follow us, we will follow you right back..Thank you.. http://twitter.com/home

herappleness's profile pic

Posted (Answer #12)

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I discovered recently another great use for Twitter in the classroom: I assign a topic and I asked them to download Tweet Deck which is free.  Then, they had to search each other on twitter (which is in itself a research skill), and then they have to make a group only for answering the topics I post. They also had to come up with a Tweet Shirt logo the other day for the competition.

Of course, the day Michael Jackson died nobody could do anything due to the lines being blocked, but that was also a learning experience in itself.

mcalnan's profile pic

Posted (Answer #13)

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Yes I do and I love it! Kids who are adept at getting it sent to their phones are equally in love! I send homework reminders, extra credit questions, newsclips on the evening news, discussion questions and even when they need to login to enotes because I've posted a question in our private groups! Twitter is a great way for me to reach the kids after class and keep them thinking about the material! I love it

accessteacher's profile pic

Posted (Answer #14)

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Thanks as well for all of these great ideas and I definitely am thinking about how to incorporate twitter into my teaching. I am just a bit concerned about bombarding students with so many different ways of e-learning rather than focussing on just one or two. Anyone else share my concerns? And does using mediums such as twitter distract from the subject matter at hand?

litteacher8's profile pic

Posted (Answer #15)

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I am not on Twitter, but I can see it's use in the classroom.  For example, last night I had an e-mail exchange with a student last night and realized there was a question about the due date for an assignment.  I could have sent out a tweet reminding my students!

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