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What the teacher is trying to accomplish by this activity.What is the purpose of all...

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mubin2712 | Student, Undergraduate | Salutatorian

Posted September 19, 2010 at 11:16 AM via web

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What the teacher is trying to accomplish by this activity.What is the purpose of all those activity.

In an effort to match buddy reader from next 3rd grade, second grade teacher maintain a reading log where buddy reader can put comment about their reading, they can share comment, they can write their reading experience. Friend can see other friend's log and share comment. Buddy can make suggestion as well.Teacher assign individual mail box for every one. What the teacher is trying to accomplish by this activity.

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mkcapen1 | Middle School Teacher | Valedictorian

Posted September 19, 2010 at 12:06 PM (Answer #2)

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As a teacher of language arts I would be hoping that by setting up a buddy reader with self and buddy critique the student would be able to accept cues and critique from his peer better than from an adult.  In the same way that the student learns to accept critique, he is also learning to engage in appropriate critique.

The primary purpose of having a buddy reader is to place two students together in which one is a little stronger a reader.  The stronger reader is to alternate reading with the weaker reader.  This method provides for less embarrassment during oral reading as the students are two people reading to each other instead of a student having to read before a larger group.  In addition each reader can provide support and guidance with the stronger reader helping the weaker reader to have more personalized support during reading. 

The end result would be the weaker reader to become better able to self-check of errors, and to improve his reading fluency.

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Michelle Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted September 19, 2010 at 12:21 PM (Answer #3)

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First of all, these are called tandem learning activities in which two students (one of higher skill than the other also known as an MKO) is able to formally organize his or her thoughts in order to bring a less knowledgeable other student (LKO) up to a higher level of thinking.

By tackling the MKO and LKO at the same time, the teacher would accomplish that the student who already knows the process would become creative enough to enhance the skills they already know while the other student will get to the independent learning point that would help him or her move to a higher level.

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amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted September 21, 2010 at 7:34 AM (Answer #4)

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I have used similar activities called Think/Pair/Share where the first student reads, records his or her thoughts on the issue, then pairs with another student to get his/her opinions.  This forces an answer from all students first of all (general groupwork often encourages the quieter students to ride on the coattails of other, more outgoing kids), and then it requires students not only to think about and accept other viewpoints, but perhaps even to defend his or her own.   This is a great activity for promoting tolerance and open-mindedness for all ideas.

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted September 21, 2010 at 7:58 AM (Answer #5)

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Research has shown that students accept correction and encouragement better from their peers than from their teacher, unfortunately! This is one of the strengths of the approach you have outlined - by pairing a student with another peer who is better at reading, you are encouraging teamwork and also helping that student to gain sensitive feedback and correction which he or she is more likely to use to spur them on in their reading.

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Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted September 21, 2010 at 6:43 PM (Answer #6)

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If both people  in the pairing take the exercise seriously, this is always going to be a benefit to students, especially younger students.  I find the same kind of thing works in peer editing for writing, to some degree.  The weaker student gains some confidence as he or she responds to the work of a stronger writer.  At some point there is a limited value for the stronger student and the pairings have to change; however, there is a lot of intuitive work in peer editing at which weaker students can be successful.  Reading is kind of the some way--even a weak reader can recognize what's effective and what's not, and hearing good reading does encourage better reading, I find.  Good idea!

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mubin2712 | Student, Undergraduate | Salutatorian

Posted September 26, 2010 at 12:27 AM (Answer #7)

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As a teacher of language arts I would be hoping that by setting up a buddy reader with self and buddy critique the student would be able to accept cues and critique from his peer better than from an adult.  In the same way that the student learns to accept critique, he is also learning to engage in appropriate critique.

The primary purpose of having a buddy reader is to place two students together in which one is a little stronger a reader.  The stronger reader is to alternate reading with the weaker reader.  This method provides for less embarrassment during oral reading as the students are two people reading to each other instead of a student having to read before a larger group.  In addition each reader can provide support and guidance with the stronger reader helping the weaker reader to have more personalized support during reading. 

The end result would be the weaker reader to become better able to self-check of errors, and to improve his reading fluency.

I understand you are talking about Buddy reading. But here the teacher is doing something like: maintaining a log where they can write their comment about the book they read, they can give suggestion in writing about the book they read, they can write their experience about their own reading. Each of the  student have a mail box whre they can keep their log. buddy have the opportunity to read it, share it. Is it more about writing. In typical buddy reading we don't see stuff like that. This put me in confusion.

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mubin2712 | Student, Undergraduate | Salutatorian

Posted September 26, 2010 at 12:30 AM (Answer #8)

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First of all, these are called tandem learning activities in which two students (one of higher skill than the other also known as an MKO) is able to formally organize his or her thoughts in order to bring a less knowledgeable other student (LKO) up to a higher level of thinking.

By tackling the MKO and LKO at the same time, the teacher would accomplish that the student who already knows the process would become creative enough to enhance the skills they already know while the other student will get to the independent learning point that would help him or her move to a higher level.

maintaining a log where they can write their comment about the book they read, they can give suggestion in writing about the book they read, they can write their experience about their own reading. Each of the  student have a mail box whre they can keep their log. buddy have the opportunity to read it, share it. Is it kind of reflective writing? In typical buddy reading we don't see all those things, do we?

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mubin2712 | Student, Undergraduate | Salutatorian

Posted September 26, 2010 at 1:53 AM (Answer #9)

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If both people  in the pairing take the exercise seriously, this is always going to be a benefit to students, especially younger students.  I find the same kind of thing works in peer editing for writing, to some degree.  The weaker student gains some confidence as he or she responds to the work of a stronger writer.  At some point there is a limited value for the stronger student and the pairings have to change; however, there is a lot of intuitive work in peer editing at which weaker students can be successful.  Reading is kind of the some way--even a weak reader can recognize what's effective and what's not, and hearing good reading does encourage better reading, I find.  Good idea!

"maintaining a log where they can write their comment about the book they read, they can give suggestion in writing about the book they read, they can write their experience about their own reading." Are those things example of :

1. Reflecting thinking  or

2. reflective writing

 

 

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lrwilliams | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted October 10, 2010 at 9:42 AM (Answer #10)

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Possibly the teacher is trying to implement some writing into the reading process. By having the students write about the passage and then share and "peer" edit each others writing she is possibly laying the foundation for some more extensive writing activities.

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted August 12, 2011 at 3:28 PM (Answer #11)

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There are a couple of things going on here.  The older child might be a poor reader, and by reading to a younger child he practices at his level without being embarrassed.  Reading with a slightly older child might make the younger child less self-concious as well.

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mrstyndall | Elementary School Teacher | eNoter

Posted May 9, 2013 at 4:43 AM (Answer #12)

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I agree with the reasoning previously mentioned. A more simplistic reason for assigning this type of 'Buddy Reading' exercise is that it holds students accountable for actually having to read a text in a manner that allows them to discuss and answer related questions. Furthermore, in allows students an opportunity share their thoughts, feelings, insights, conclusions, etc. about what was read. As all teachers know, almost every student wants to share about what they are doing, or what they think, feel, and understand. Buddy reading exercises allow students to share as well as be heard. 

 

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