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Should people not trained in teaching be allowed to teach?  I have a debate about this...

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hamda | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted October 19, 2009 at 9:40 PM via web

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Should people not trained in teaching be allowed to teach?

 

I have a debate about this topic and I cannot find any information. Please, I want to know why an untrained teacher should not be allowed to teach?

 

Please I want somebody to help me.

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kiwi | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted October 19, 2009 at 10:30 PM (Answer #2)

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Here in New Zealand we have a system whereby an individual whom the school considers qualified in terms of experience can be given a Limited Authority to Teach (LAT). This system is particularly useful when recruiting in areas where business and trade skills are important. This has worked well with recruiting teachers into Hospitality and Catering courses for example, where experienced chefs can give a realistic outline to students and have a clear knowledge of the requirements of industry when formulating and offering a course. I have also had experience of an LAT in my English Department who was brought in to assist during a colleague’s sick leave. The LAT was a former soldier who had seen active service in East Timor. She was extremely well equipped to engage, motivate and (where necessary) discipline students. With support and guidance on the curriculum content she became one of the best teachers I have ever worked with. Of course we need to ensure that anyone working in a classroom has an appropriate level of education, a police check and the required support. However we can ignore a wealth of untapped resources in our communities if we do not take a more creative and forward thinking approach to education. We have curriculum areas worldwide where we struggle to recruit ‘trained’ teachers. There is a great benefit in reviewing by what we mean by ‘trained’, and what ‘training’ best facilitates the development of our students.
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enotechris | College Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted October 20, 2009 at 2:40 AM (Answer #3)

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Are parents teachers to their children?  Should people not trained in parenting be allowed to parent?  In both cases, the questions imply some sort of authority who can grant or revoke  abilities that people already have.  Some teachers are better than others, and the better ones by definition would seek to find the best methods to instruct.  A key reason the public school system in the US is in shambles is because it is the purview of many teachers who have become licensed and "paid their dues" to secure a job, and the position is treated as such.  The process to become "trained" is such that it may benefit financially the institution claiming to instruct teachers to teach, but appears to be only a gateway to secure state recognition. Having endured that process, many teachers then treat teaching as a job, to the detriment of their students.  The best teachers, "untrained" or not, inspire students to want to learn, regardless of whatever outside agency proposes or insists upon.

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Susan Hurn | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted October 20, 2009 at 11:13 AM (Answer #4)

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For the purposes of your argument, you might also point out that most businesses and corporations provide specific training for their employees once they are hired, after they have completed college to master the knowledge in their particular field. The argument can be made that teachers really learn how to teach, not in education courses, but in the classroom. (That's why education majors spend a semester away from campus completing student teaching.)

Individuals whose education and experience have made them very knowledgable and more than competent in their fields of study can learn the art and science of teaching (learning strategies and classroom management) by being on the job in the classroom and by completing district-sponsored professional development classes and workshops. Continuing education classes, which are now required for most licensed teachers, would also develop teaching skills for these individuals. The desire to teach well and to help students, with the proper support, is more important than having jumped through all the university education department hoops.

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hamda | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted October 20, 2009 at 8:39 PM (Answer #5)

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thank you for you help

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danduri | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 20, 2009 at 11:38 PM (Answer #6)

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Yes, untrained teachers should not be allowed to teach. knowingly or un knowingly they are spoiling student's life n career by inputting half knowledge. I belive ITS(indian teacher service) should be ther just like IAS & IPS. then only our educaion system will get reformed childhood is the stage where in child know about the life n world.we have to guide them in such a way what our country requires from them. they are gonna learn every thing in school life only so. an untrained techer can spoil them we need teachers with passion un fortunatly they are teachng with fashion   

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krishna-agrawala | College Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted October 21, 2009 at 6:15 AM (Answer #7)

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If by "allowed to teach" you mean allowed to practice teaching as the primary profession, it may make some sense to insist on training in methods and skill of teaching. But there are many people who are very knowledgeable in their field and may do some amount of teaching in addition to their main profession. To insist that such people also must take formal training in teaching will be counter productive. This will restrict the spread of the most advanced and the latest knowledge, as professional teacher are not very likely to possess such knowledge.

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hamda | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted October 24, 2009 at 7:12 AM (Answer #8)

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Thanx a lot 4 for your help and sorry for bothering

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ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted October 27, 2009 at 12:05 PM (Answer #9)

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As a teacher, there are some observations that I would like to make. I spent 5 years of my life on an undergraduate degree to pursue my vocation. This education developed a very broad base of knowledge in the subject area in which I teach. Business professionals have been similarly trained in their field and have a broad base of knowledge that would translate well into the classroom.

Where the two groups diverge is the education and strategies that teachers who go through a teacher education program receive with regard to how students learn--their behavior, their psychology, their maturity, their gender, their SES, and etc. That is why you will find that many state institutions have developed programs that will enable people of other professions to become certified after they have taken and passed courses in those above mentioned areas. Our state (or some of our universities) offers a Masters in Teaching or a MAT degree. It certifies professionals as teachers after they have completed a program that offers courses essential to quality teaching. After all, let's face it, simply being good at doing something does not mean you will be successful at teaching someone else how to do it. 

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kfrogteacher | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Honors

Posted October 28, 2009 at 8:20 PM (Answer #10)

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With ACP (Alternative Teaching Programs) programs, anyone who has a degree in the U.S. can parlay that into a teaching job. From a Special Education stand point, I don't feel an unqualified person should be allowed teach. I work in a behavior class and when ,for example, a sub comes in there that has never been in that environment, they can do more damage that good.

Those classes are very difficult classes with the individual students personalities and most students in the class being coded with an "Emotional Disturbance" label. Any new situation is potientially cause for problems. Without any training someone could walk in and set-off a student and be completely unaware of what they have done. This prospect has caused me to be very careful about absences.  

Another simualr case can be seen in a autism unit. Autism is a very difficult disorder to deal with. Introducing a stranger to a student with autism and pica, and eating disorder where the person cannot physically stop eating, without training could possibly harm the student. Not knowing that the student has their problems this person could simply set a cup of tea down on their desk with a plastic spoon and straw and turn away for an instant and that drink, straw and spoon be eaten. This really happens - I know of a student that got to a pound of coffee and ate it all. The parent sent them to school and they were throwing up black stuff from the bus. Not knowing the student; how would you react. 

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted October 31, 2009 at 8:51 PM (Answer #11)

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There are any number of teachers nowadays working in schools without teacher certification.  In California, for instance, may business people have been hired as well as in big cities throughout the nation because of shortages.  (You should be able to find data on this situation.)  While many of these people without teacher certification have learned "people skills" and have great sales skills, they are successful teachers in many cases. 

However, it seems that those without experience working with people may need those methods classes, etc. to assist them.

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jseligmann | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted November 8, 2009 at 8:28 PM (Answer #12)

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Before I could be put in the position of contributing to forums and answering Questions as an Editor here at enotes.com, I was asked to submit three sample answers for review. Then some person or group of people read my answers and decided, based on those answers, that I was fit to contribute. They decided that I probably knew what I was talking about and also knew how to appropriately get my point across. They acted as a kind of filter... a board of approval.

I think such a filtering system is highly appropriate when it comes to deciding who is fit to stand in front of a class of children for the purpose of teaching them and guiding them. Yes I do.

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alan1948 | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 15, 2009 at 4:25 PM (Answer #13)

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I believe that some people are natural born teachers.  They have the ability to capture the attention of their students and present information in a very effective way.  When you couple this natural ability with a lot of knowledge of the subject matter you have a very effective teacher.

I've been teaching for 40 years.   I have worked with teachers who have all kinds of educational degrees but are not successful teachers.  The same is true of those who have expertise in a certain subject matter.  They know everything about the curriculum but don't know how to engage the students.

A god teacher must love teaching.  You have to put your heart and soul into it.  Teaching has always been a passion for me, not a job. After all these years I still love what I do. I think that is why I have had such tremendous success over my career.

I'll end by saying that I truly believe teachers are born, not made.

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readerofbooks | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted November 19, 2009 at 8:53 PM (Answer #14)

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I think the answer to that question should be yes and no.

1. If a person has little training or no training, but a complete natural. Let that person teach. There should be an exception clause to allow for this. But ordinarily, a person should get training.

2. If a person has training and can't teach, make that person an administrator.

 

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docmelillo | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 27, 2009 at 4:51 PM (Answer #15)

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As a 36 year veteran teacher, I have seen many educators come through this profession and it is very easy to spot those who are not "career teachers," those who tell others, "Well, I could always teach."    Many instructors reveal themselves immediately. Comments such as, "I've been teaching for six years and I don't know if I'm going to make it until ten. Forget about making it until retirement..." or "I can't wait until the summer" are usually accompanied by unfocused lesson plans and ineffective classroom management. Teaching is obviously something these people are "settling for" rather than a passion or focus in their lives. "Teaching is not for sissies," to paraphrase Bette Davis. Many instructors are very knowledgable within their fields of study but really do not like students.  The kids can "smell" this. The patience that it takes to present materials ten different ways until the students "get it" or to even realize when students don't get it requires training and talent. To say, "I taught this," does not necessarily mean that a lesson was "learned" by the students. Teaching and learning is a collaborative effort that requires continually making adjustments to technique and presentation. Change, which most people hate, is a continual requirement of an instructor. Infusing creative technology, applying effective pedagogy, and displaying caring enthusiasm is a daily (hourly) requirement. Those who can't shouldn't teach.

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noelle3366 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted November 27, 2009 at 6:35 PM (Answer #16)

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Do you want to be operated on by an untrained sergeon? Not me.

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noelle3366 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted November 27, 2009 at 6:44 PM (Answer #17)

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The best way to debate is to follow Aristotles advice. Know your audience! Who are you persuading? Know their Ethos, or ethics and morals, Logos, or their type of logic and reasoning, and Pathos, how can they be reached on an emotional level. Target your market.Inotherwordswhenyou argue your point in the debate, follow closely these three aspects of the person or persons you are trying  to persuade. And no, one should not be an educator without the proper qualifications. Would you want to be operated on by an untrained sergeon?

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barb1011 | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 29, 2009 at 6:52 PM (Answer #18)

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This is a hot topic in Florida because we have an alternative certification process.  Many retired business people go through it thinking the usual, "How hard can it be, summers off and lots of holidays."  They think they know it all.  But when push comes to shove, and testing time approaches they are appalled at their scores.

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n2drama | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 29, 2009 at 8:19 PM (Answer #19)

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I have a B.F.A. in Speech Communications/Theater Performance with over 30 years of experience in theater. My prior work experience was 20 years as a federal employee culminating with a stint as a Congressional Aide. I have been in the classroom for 10 years, teaching everything from 5th grade to high school level Speech in public and private schools. 

I am currently in graduate school to get a Master's -with certification- in teaching ESL. Guess what? While I find my classes very interesting, I'm basically learning everything in my courses that I've been doing instinctually in the classroom as a non-certified teacher. And after a $26,000.00 investment,  I'll be looked upon as a "real" teacher. (I've actually been told by certified teachers that I'm not a "real" teacher since I don't have the paperwork to back it up.)

I believe that credentialling is important; however, either you have the gift of teaching or you don't. I've seen many teachers let go because they were horrible with classroom management, made inappropriate advances to students, or just didn't care to go the extra mile that you must as a teacher. If a person can demonstrate attitude and aptitude towards teaching, I think they should be allowed to do so to prove themselves. Treat them with respect and pay them like a "real" teacher. Teaching comes from the heart, not the books.

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chinajoe | Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 29, 2009 at 11:10 PM (Answer #20)

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I believe teachers are born, not made. Meaning, good teachers have a gift for passing on information in an interesting manner. I came to China 6 years ago to teach oral English; at that time the only 'qualification' needed was to be a native English speaker. I have had colleagues with no univeristy degree, let alone a teaching degree (I have a B.A. in Film & Television Production).

I was certainly not trained as a teacher, but I believe it is what I was born to do. No job I've had previously has given me the same satisfaction. In China, many foreigners work as teachers, many of them with no such qualifications. Some of them are very good, most are not. However, I don't think it's a lack of a teacher qualification that makes the difference. It depends much more on the individual teacher's interest and ability to reach his/her students.

The general thinking in the West is, teachers should be trained to teach, and though, on some level, I agree, many potentially great teachers have no such training. Even with all the experience in the world, teachers still need to have that peice of paper. It is a shame to deny students the best teachers simply because they don't have a 'teaching' degree.

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twinwriter | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 1, 2009 at 2:44 PM (Answer #21)

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Do you want to be operated on by an untrained sergeon? Not me.

I think this is a completely different question. If a person has knowledge of their subject matter, and compassion for the students, they can probably teach. I am in a charter school and more than half of our teachers are not certified because they are not required to be certified to teach in a charter school. All of them have at least a bachelor's degree. Many of them have advanced degrees in their chosen field. Does this make them bad teachers, just becasue they don't have a certificate to hang on the wall? Of course not. what makes them bad teachers (or good ones) is the whether or not they are willing to listen, pay attention, care, and try to help the students learn, mature and grow. What makes them good teachers is their compassion and their love of the subject matter, and their ability to share that subject with others. I am a certified teacher, but I do not mind sharing the stage with uncertified ones, as long as they care as much about the success of my "babies" as I do. How many "trained" teachers really learned how to teach in a college classroom? I know I didn't. I learned in the classroom, by actually getting in front of the kids and just doing it.

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daisydharma | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted December 3, 2009 at 7:51 PM (Answer #22)

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As a successful product of my district's ACP (Alternate Certification Program), I have to argue on the positive side of placing degreed professionals into the classroom without having an education degree.  I have a BA in Theater Arts and a BA in Literature.  I've always known that I was born to teach, but I chose to not get a degree in education.  After comparing the required classes for Literature vs. Education, I made the decision that Literature was going to be a better program for me.  Now, I have almost three times the amount of education in my content area as colleagues who have completed Education degrees.  I am not in any way devaluing teachers who persue Education degrees.  I am just saying that it worked best for me to use my formal education to learn content area information and to learn my Education skills through a more informal method.  Plus, I was able to learn my classroom skills through practice rather than theory.  Many districts provide excellent training and support for "non-traditional" teachers.  Good teachers know how to find and use their resources. As with any field that a person chooses to work, it is the person and not the training program that makes the difference between a qualified and an unqualified employee.

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bossmyers | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 10, 2009 at 11:47 AM (Answer #23)

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Should people not trained in teaching be allowed to teach?

 

I have a debate about this topic and I cannot find any information. Please, I want to know why an untrained teacher should not be allowed to teach?

 

Please I want somebody to help me.

  In response to your question as to whether untrained people should teach.

It is one thing to know content such as science, social studies, math etc...but it is and enitrely different matter when it comes to teaching.  Children go through developmental stages from the time they are born until they reach adulthood.

For instance when I was in college we learned all about the different stages of the development of a child.  We learned what was appropriate to teach as various ages and also how to teach specific age groups.  .

When teaching preschool through 3rd grade, much of your instruction should be delivered by concrete activities where children have hands on experiences because that is how they learn best, it does carry on through 5th grade but the shift begins to be more lecture and activity.

If a person does not understand the instructional sequence of teachinga  child to read, chances are there will be a huge gap in learning and could possibly cause permanant damage to their reading skills, most children who do not have a good phonetic base by age 8 more than likely will never learn to read phonectically because they do not hear the sounds and cannot make connections.

There are literally hundreds of concepts and skills we must know how and when to teach in every subject.

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mkcapen1 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted December 10, 2009 at 4:32 PM (Answer #24)

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Years ago I might have said yes, but after changing careers at 50 and going back to college I have a change of opinion.  In college I was introduced to methods of reading, learning styles, and acclimated to science, math, social studies, and language arts.  I already had a degree in social work but even though I use many of the social work skills as a teacher, it is the schools I was taught in teacher training that enhance my student's eduction.  I can clearly see the difference because I worked as a substitute for two years while I was trying to determine if I wanted to become a teacher.

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tey | High School Teacher | (Level 2) eNoter

Posted December 17, 2009 at 6:48 AM (Answer #26)

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As a teacher, there are some observations that I would like to make. I spent 5 years of my life on an undergraduate degree to pursue my vocation. This education developed a very broad base of knowledge in the subject area in which I teach. Business professionals have been similarly trained in their field and have a broad base of knowledge that would translate well into the classroom.

Where the two groups diverge is the education and strategies that teachers who go through a teacher education program receive with regard to how students learn--their behavior, their psychology, their maturity, their gender, their SES, and etc. That is why you will find that many state institutions have developed programs that will enable people of other professions to become certified after they have taken and passed courses in those above mentioned areas. Our state (or some of our universities) offers a Masters in Teaching or a MAT degree. It certifies professionals as teachers after they have completed a program that offers courses essential to quality teaching. After all, let's face it, simply being good at doing something does not mean you will be successful at teaching someone else how to do it. 

I continue to stress. Simply because someone has taken a course does not mean that they are capable of stepping into a classroom setting and actually doing the job. I have my credentials and did so in a very different way. The best credential I have is the fact that I am knowledgeable in my field and that I can successfully convey to the students what they need in order to achieve.

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tey | High School Teacher | (Level 2) eNoter

Posted December 17, 2009 at 6:51 AM (Answer #25)

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Yes, untrained teachers should not be allowed to teach. knowingly or un knowingly they are spoiling student's life n career by inputting half knowledge. I belive ITS(indian teacher service) should be ther just like IAS & IPS. then only our educaion system will get reformed childhood is the stage where in child know about the life n world.we have to guide them in such a way what our country requires from them. they are gonna learn every thing in school life only so. an untrained techer can spoil them we need teachers with passion un fortunatly they are teachng with fashion   

I don't know if you are a teacher, however I ask, does a degree make one a teacher? I meet plenty of teachers fresh out of college who have absolutely no clue! Does passing the bar exam make one a lawyer? These are technical passings to a license, that is all!

I have been teaching for over ten years. I did not attend school to be a teacher. I attended College to grow and expand my mind. I learned my best lessons living life! I continue to educate myself in many way, including working on my MBA. I meet the National requirements of teaching and hold a license based on the tests required to get that license. However, I am not a teacher because I have those licenses. I am a teacher because that is what I was purposed for and my students experience my passion and desire to learn from me.

Students today need to be critical thinkers. If an individual is a critical thinker they can pass that on. If the individual is a critical thinker they can expand the minds of our young ones in hopes of a better future!

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tey | High School Teacher | (Level 2) eNoter

Posted December 17, 2009 at 6:58 AM (Answer #28)

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As a 36 year veteran teacher, I have seen many educators come through this profession and it is very easy to spot those who are not "career teachers," those who tell others, "Well, I could always teach."    Many instructors reveal themselves immediately. Comments such as, "I've been teaching for six years and I don't know if I'm going to make it until ten. Forget about making it until retirement..." or "I can't wait until the summer" are usually accompanied by unfocused lesson plans and ineffective classroom management. Teaching is obviously something these people are "settling for" rather than a passion or focus in their lives. "Teaching is not for sissies," to paraphrase Bette Davis. Many instructors are very knowledgable within their fields of study but really do not like students.  The kids can "smell" this. The patience that it takes to present materials ten different ways until the students "get it" or to even realize when students don't get it requires training and talent. To say, "I taught this," does not necessarily mean that a lesson was "learned" by the students. Teaching and learning is a collaborative effort that requires continually making adjustments to technique and presentation. Change, which most people hate, is a continual requirement of an instructor. Infusing creative technology, applying effective pedagogy, and displaying caring enthusiasm is a daily (hourly) requirement. Those who can't shouldn't teach.

Most of what you shared was spot on, and very well said. And I hang to the last part of your comment, as I was never taught to teach and students learn in my classroom!

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tey | High School Teacher | (Level 2) eNoter

Posted December 17, 2009 at 7:01 AM (Answer #29)

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This is a hot topic in Florida because we have an alternative certification process.  Many retired business people go through it thinking the usual, "How hard can it be, summers off and lots of holidays."  They think they know it all.  But when push comes to shove, and testing time approaches they are appalled at their scores.

I know teachers who have completed all their required education to become a teacher who have the identical mentality. This mentality is a poor one if one is to be successful in a classroom setting. However, not limited to those who acheived their teaching credentials in an alternative manner.

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tey | High School Teacher | (Level 2) eNoter

Posted December 17, 2009 at 7:03 AM (Answer #27)

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With ACP (Alternative Teaching Programs) programs, anyone who has a degree in the U.S. can parlay that into a teaching job. From a Special Education stand point, I don't feel an unqualified person should be allowed teach. I work in a behavior class and when ,for example, a sub comes in there that has never been in that environment, they can do more damage that good.

Those classes are very difficult classes with the individual students personalities and most students in the class being coded with an "Emotional Disturbance" label. Any new situation is potientially cause for problems. Without any training someone could walk in and set-off a student and be completely unaware of what they have done. This prospect has caused me to be very careful about absences.  

Another simualr case can be seen in a autism unit. Autism is a very difficult disorder to deal with. Introducing a stranger to a student with autism and pica, and eating disorder where the person cannot physically stop eating, without training could possibly harm the student. Not knowing that the student has their problems this person could simply set a cup of tea down on their desk with a plastic spoon and straw and turn away for an instant and that drink, straw and spoon be eaten. This really happens - I know of a student that got to a pound of coffee and ate it all. The parent sent them to school and they were throwing up black stuff from the bus. Not knowing the student; how would you react. 

It takes special people to teach special people! However, these special people are not made in a college course! Your response seems to segway from the original question. I agree that it takes special understanding to work with Autistic children. However, I know people who do so without a degree. The text book does not know Johnny or Sally. The text book knows of conditions and based on studies, some of what can happen if... Hence, what you are truly talking about is relationship, intuition and personality.

As far as substitute teachers. I started as one. I walked into a Special Education class of eight 5th grade boys who were labeled with severe issues. After my first week on the job I could not handle all of the requests from the staff to substitute in their room. At that time, and to this day, I do not have a teaching degree from any College. I am eduated with Degrees, however none of them in Special Ed, Reading or otherwise. I am in year twelve and going strong as a State Certified Teacher. I have had numerous other career situations and I am an example to my students that you can do anything you are purposed to do!

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lroderick | College Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 23, 2009 at 8:30 AM (Answer #30)

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Should people not trained in teaching be allowed to teach?

 

I have a debate about this topic and I cannot find any information. Please, I want to know why an untrained teacher should not be allowed to teach?

 

Please I want somebody to help me.

The topic of not allowing individuals who are not trained in teaching is one that has been debated in all 50 states. Here in the US we allow alternative routes to teaching but the argument is that some of these people have no methods (ways to teach the material) for the classroom. It is proven that one bad year with a teacher who is not fulfilling their duties takes the students 3 years to make that up. This is why there is the argument. It is also very hard for untrained teachers to to learn how to manage a classroom of students it is not like managing a company of employees. This can create chaos for the students and the teacher. I believe with the right training untrained teachers can be successful but there needs to be certain items in place. These individuals should need to take a methods class, have a mentor, and work on classroom management. Also, many times these individuals quit in the middle or sooner of the school year because they did not understand what they really have to do as a teacher. This is a problem for students and the school also. It is never good to start with a teacher learn his or her ways and then they "give up" on the job. Many times students see this as someone else giving up on them.

I hope this helps you with your debate.

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caramlized00 | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 17, 2010 at 4:41 PM (Answer #31)

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I agree. Teachers who have not been trained to teach should not be in the classroom. Its important that you go through college and have some experience with student teaching experience under your belt. If a teacher has not been trained, I think they will be more likely to quit. Many people think that teaching is such an easy job, but as a teacher myself it definetly is not so. There is so much you have to remember and so many responsibilites including: paperwork, filing, communcation with parents (who sometimes don't care about their child's education), trainings on your off-days (like Saturdays) dealing with administration, grading, testing, and relationships with coworkers, are only a few things you have to deal with. It's just not as easy as some people think.

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kapokkid | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted April 16, 2010 at 7:48 AM (Answer #32)

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I never went to school for teaching.  I've gotten a masters degree in education now but I will admit that it has done nothing to really help my teaching in the classroom.  I had loads of experience teaching, but not in formal settings, prior to getting the job I have now and I think I am actually better off not having gone through a teacher training program.

I think schools should be allowed to decide who they think is qualified to teach.  Ideally parents would be making these decisions along with students, but they don't currently have that option in most places.

The stranglehold on teacher certification maintained by most collegs is simply one of monetary interest, they provide nearly 30% of the revenue of universities in this country.  Some people who go through them can teach and some people can't and I don't believe that they improve those abilities (though student teaching is a very valuable experience).

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besure77 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted May 31, 2010 at 7:44 AM (Answer #33)

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I totally agree that teachers must be properly trained to teach in the classroom. If they are not, then they should not be teaching. Keep in mind that there are lots of different ways that people get the experience they need in order to become great teachers.

Teachers need to be prepared for many different scenarios. It is not an easy job and every day brings new, and sometimes unexpected things.

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Wiggin42 | Student, Grade 11 | (Level 2) Valedictorian

Posted June 29, 2014 at 5:54 PM (Answer #34)

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Teaching is a part and parcel of  a human being. Children first learn from their parent. After teaching is an  inborn talent. Some of the best mentors in the history are not educated or trained but they can be a best teacher in their field. Teaching is a passion and spreads the knowledge among people,so it should not be bottled up.

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crystaltu001 | Student, Grade 10 | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted July 30, 2014 at 7:51 AM (Answer #35)

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Teaching comes natural for some people. As a baby and a child your parents taught you a lot of things. Some people do not need to be trained or have a degree to be a teacher. If they like teaching people and spreading more knowledge than let them do what they want.

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