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How do you manage your time when you have a lot of marking and assesments and exams to...

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just-s | Student, Grade 11 | Valedictorian

Posted July 7, 2012 at 5:26 AM via web

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How do you manage your time when you have a lot of marking and assesments and exams to prepare and family to see to and spend time with at the same time?

just basic tips and personal experiences and ideas in how to??/ tnx ;-)

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larrygates | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted May 17, 2012 at 8:14 PM (Answer #2)

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I hope this is transferred to the discussion board where it can receive a variety of responses.

I have found that machine graded tests are a life saver. My department purchased its own scanning machine which grades tests quickly and efficiently. For papers which must be read and marked up, I set aside several hours over my weekend (sadly there is no other choice) to get that done; and make every effort to keep all my papers organized by class. I also inform my students that assignments such as this will not be returned prior to the next Monday. Seeing families is obviously a constant problem; however I have found the best way is to insist that parents schedule an appointment at a time convenient to both of us. I also set aside a certain amount of time each day/week for my own family, so called "me time." It is perhaps unfortunate as teachers that we must live such structured lives; however the alternative is mass confusion.

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breezuchy | eNotes Newbie

Posted May 17, 2012 at 8:56 PM (Answer #3)

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when ever you have free time in the day try to correct the papers. some papers you can have your students correct if there old enough and trusted enough to correct them. work out a schedule to get your work done. kids like homework as much as we like correcting it. i try to give less homework because when kids are at home its family  time and not homework time. if u work at a faster paste durniing class, you could have sometime to do the homework with the kids so theyll already have the correct answers and will not be needed to be corrected by you. you could also ask you husband/wife/friend help you correct the papers to. hope this helped!! 

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Kristen Lentz | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted July 7, 2012 at 11:07 AM (Answer #4)

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I sleep less.  I mean, that sounds simple, but I just cut down on sleep.  I think having kids grade papers is a great idea, and you could also focus on different assessment strategies that don't involve grading papers.  I often have class discussions where I tally grades during the discussion.  When the class is finished all I have to do is put the grade in the gradebook.

I tell teachers that there are three aspects of life for our profession- sleep, social/ family life, and career.  I chose to be a great mom and a great teacher, therefore, I don't sleep as much as I would like to. 

 

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted July 7, 2012 at 1:26 PM (Answer #5)

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You just do it, that's all.  Every job has its good sides and bad sides and the time that teaching takes is one of its bad sides. 

Of course, the pressures do get reduced a bit as you go along.  Once you've taught something for a few years, you have most of your lessons and tests and such basically made.  You then don't have to spend the same amount of time as you once did.  It's still a lot of work, but you're not creating things 100% new as you did when you were starting out.

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wannam | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted July 7, 2012 at 6:57 PM (Answer #6)

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It's important to manage the time you have set aside for work so that you can spend your free time with family and friends.  For instance, I would stay at work until 6 or 7 pm.  I went to work early and stayed late but I didn't take any work home.  It helped for my family to know that when I was home I was there to spend time with them.  It did make the days longer for me, but I personally felt much more relaxed because I got to have time away from work with my family.  I would also take papers with me everywhere I went during work.  If I went to make copies, I took papers with me to grade.  Inevitably, there was time to grade a few while waiting my turn or waiting for the machine to copy.  If I went to a meeting, I took paper to grade.  Of course, I stopped and paid attention once the meeting started, but I usually had time to grade before things got started.  You get the idea.  Squeezing every moment out of the work day is an important part of time management, especially for a teacher.

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mwalter822 | Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

Posted July 8, 2012 at 2:10 AM (Answer #7)

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I give shorter assignments that take less time to grade. Or, as an alternative, I might give an assignment of normal length but only grade a certain part of it.

I honestly think that the massive amount of time we tend to spend grading things can be counterproductive sometimes. Students don't need to have every single thing graded. They need meaningful feedback in manageable chunks that they can do something with.

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rrteacher | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted July 8, 2012 at 4:03 AM (Answer #8)

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I pretty much just do it, too. Sometimes I break grading up into small chunks (i.e. 10 papers at a time or so.) Others I just sit down and do it. I do agree, however, with many of the strategies mentioned on here, in particular student grading. Another timesaver is coming up with clear, precise rubrics for writing assignments, especially. That way you shouldn't really have to leave too many comments, your rubric should show why students have remarks. I also make a practice of writing "See me" on papers when I have a lot of comments to make. Sometimes its better to do in person anyway.

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litlady33 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Assistant Educator

Posted July 9, 2012 at 1:11 AM (Answer #9)

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As a relatively new teacher, this is something I am trying to figure out for myself. I am learning that it's important to balance and have priorities. As long as school is in session, there will be work to do. I could work every day from the moment I wake up to the moment I go to sleep and there would still be more work to be done. But that would be unhealthy and unfair to my loved ones. Most of the time, I just have to tell myself to stop, and that I can get to it later.

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mizzwillie | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted July 9, 2012 at 4:13 PM (Answer #10)

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One of the ways I used students to look at essays but not the grading of essays which to me is a no-no, was to copy several essays which exemplified good points but also had ways to improve.  I would put them on the overhead with names and class removed and ask my  8 tables of four students each to come to a consensus as to what the student had done correctly and what could be improved to make it better.  Because we started with what the students had done well because that is what we build on, students didn't mind having their papers used.  Then, discussion about what improvements could be made was an eye opener for many students as they listened to the discussion.  More than once I heard students say, "That's what I do." Papers were carefully chosen, sometimes students notified ahead of time, and names were never revealed.  The grades for work and grades for effort were right on the money most of the time.  Then, I returned their own papers for reworking and got much better papers to grade.  Then, I proceeded much as the above have mentioned.

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