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If you were going to choose a play......what would it be?  Before I go gallavanting...

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malibrarian | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted January 21, 2008 at 6:18 PM via web

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If you were going to choose a play...

...what would it be?  Before I go gallavanting off on another description of what I did last summer, I thought I'd give you all a chance to tell me what Shakespearean play(s) you would choose if you were going to stage one right now.

So...which play(s) and why??? :)

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mrerick | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted January 21, 2008 at 10:02 PM (Answer #2)

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Five years ago I did Midsummer Night's Dream with our rag-tag high school drama kids.  They had all kinds of fun with it.  I routinely teach this one in my senior English class, and it kind of snowballed into our drama production from there.  We were ridiculously under-propped and under-prepared for it because of the time restraints of school, sports, etc., but the kids really did have fun.  I wish I would have had some time in the summer to work with them on it because I think it really could have been good.

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clane | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted January 22, 2008 at 8:06 AM (Answer #3)

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We don't have a drama department at our small continuation high school, but my students love Hamlet when we read it and we read it like a play in class where kids are cast into roles and have to prepare for their scenes. They love it because it really has all the makings of something that they might see in real life. Betrayal, incest, love, murder, deceit, absentee parents, jealousy, and everything else that makes this play so wonderful. I find that our students can really relate to it and Hamlet tends to bring out the love of poetry and all things Shakespeare in these kids because it makes them feel less alone in this world to know that things like this have been happening since Eve ate the darn apple! :)

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malibrarian | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted January 24, 2008 at 7:03 PM (Answer #4)

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Five years ago I did Midsummer Night's Dream with our rag-tag high school drama kids.  They had all kinds of fun with it.  I routinely teach this one in my senior English class, and it kind of snowballed into our drama production from there.  We were ridiculously under-propped and under-prepared for it because of the time restraints of school, sports, etc., but the kids really did have fun.  I wish I would have had some time in the summer to work with them on it because I think it really could have been good.

"Midsummer" is one that I would like to consider for our drama troupe in the next couple of years. We just got to see our local university theatre perform it, and it was amazing! Such a fun play, with themes that adolescents can definitely relate to and empathize with! How fun!!

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malibrarian | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted January 24, 2008 at 7:05 PM (Answer #5)

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We don't have a drama department at our small continuation high school, but my students love Hamlet when we read it and we read it like a play in class where kids are cast into roles and have to prepare for their scenes. They love it because it really has all the makings of something that they might see in real life. Betrayal, incest, love, murder, deceit, absentee parents, jealousy, and everything else that makes this play so wonderful. I find that our students can really relate to it and Hamlet tends to bring out the love of poetry and all things Shakespeare in these kids because it makes them feel less alone in this world to know that things like this have been happening since Eve ate the darn apple! :)

  I think that is wonderful that "Hamlet" appeals so well to your students. I teach it to my 7th English students, and they inevitably just think it's "cool"! (Yes, it thrills my heart to hear a teenager call Shakespeare "cool"!!) :)

That is great that you have them read it like a play in class, with the kids reading different parts aloud.  That sure does bring out the meaning of the text, doesn't it?  I've also watched (listened to) my students become stronger readers as a result of our afterschool Shakespeare Reading Group.  Very exciting!

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linda-allen | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted January 25, 2008 at 5:59 AM (Answer #6)

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I'm thinking about doing Midsummer.... this spring. With our limited resources, it might be the best for us to start with.

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malibrarian | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted January 26, 2008 at 10:47 AM (Answer #7)

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I'm thinking about doing Midsummer.... this spring. With our limited resources, it might be the best for us to start with.

"Midsummer" is so much fun - I'm sure your students will enjoy it tremendously! It's also a neat one because it just seems so open to interpretation - not the text itself, mind you, but the setting, costumes, etc. I mean, you just can't beat a magical forest full of fairies!

Do you have a thrift store in your area? Costumes, props, pieces and parts can be found inexpensively at Goodwill-type stores.

I'll start a new topic later today about the books that were helpful to me last summer...hopefully they'll be of help to someone else, too! :)

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted June 15, 2010 at 1:41 PM (Answer #8)

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I must admit I have always had a sneaking desire to put on a version of Hamlet as seeing an outstanding production is what hooked me on Shakespeare when I was in school. But at the same time I perhaps think that something like A Midsummer Night's Dream might be more practical and "doable" than going for the hard-hitting tragedy to begin with!

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted October 16, 2011 at 10:45 AM (Answer #9)

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I started with Romeo and Juliet for several reasons.  First, it was what I had.  Second, it is commonly known.  Most people know the basic story.  Third, it is a fairly easy story to follow, but it has a lot of action.  Who knew staging a massive sword fight and a dance would be so difficult, and so much fun!

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