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How do I write a soliloquy from Banquo’s or Fleance’s perspective telling of your...

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lilmama034 | eNotes Newbie

Posted May 21, 2013 at 2:11 AM via web

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How do I write a soliloquy from Banquo’s or Fleance’s perspective telling of your suspicions of Macbeth in relation to the death of King Duncan in Macbeth?

Here are the directions:  Your soliloquy should include the following:

  • either 10 lines in poetic verse or two paragraphs of prose
  • an explanation of what you suspect really happened with the death of King Duncan
  • your concerns for your own life as well as those around you
  • what you think Macbeth’s next steps will be
  • what your next steps will be to stop Macbeth

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted May 21, 2013 at 3:09 AM (Answer #1)

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You should choose to write a soliloquy in prose from Banquo’s perspective where he explains that he saw the witches’ prophecies and thinks Macbeth killed Duncan.

A soliloquy is a speech a character makes to the audience.  The more logical choice for this assignment is Banquo, because Fleance did not really know what was going on.  Banquo, on the other hand, was there when Macbeth heard the witches’ prophecies and seemed aware of what Macbeth had done.

Thou hast it now: King, Cawdor, Glamis, all,

As the weird women promised, and I fear

Thou play'dst most foully for't: (Act 3, Scene 1)

Your soliloquy could explain this.  Prose is a better choice than verse for most, even though you have to write more, because all you have to do is write using normal language (and not in Shakespearean verse).

Banquo could describe how he knows the witches told him he’d be king, and he thinks he used the prophecy as an excuse to kill the king.  He might also explain how he is worried about his own safety and maybe his family’s too, because Macbeth is not the friend he used to know.

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