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the workplaceI work for Gucci.  However, my coworkers seem to be content to only sell...

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javawalker | eNotes Newbie

Posted June 24, 2009 at 12:30 PM via web

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the workplace

I work for Gucci.  However, my coworkers seem to be content to only sell the merchandise; without knowing its' individual history or its' reason for being.  I try desperatley to question our products and our knowlage of them: but my associates are un-interested.  So, does anyone have a suggestion as to, get my fellow associates out from deep in the fur, "...to the outer tips..."?

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Michelle Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted June 24, 2009 at 3:38 PM (Answer #2)

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Lead by example. They obviously are not as professional as you are, and whatever you say will go on deaf ears. So, take the initiative to go write an e-mail, or directly request information on the company, products, research, and such and make a point to let your co-workers see what you did.

Always, when you request this info, include your own presentation card so they remember you, and so they know that you mean business: They will realize the quality of work they could get from you. You can also offer to promote a new product at no overtime charge, and explain to them that you want to explore and learn more about the company. You would be surprised at how this breaks the mold and how regarded you will be in the company.

PS: (If they give you any freebies from Gucci, don't forget me: Herappleness)

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krishna-agrawala | College Teacher | Valedictorian

Posted June 24, 2009 at 5:37 PM (Answer #3)

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Are you selling more than your associates? If yes, you can approach this issue as a method of selling more. I am sure then they will be interested in your idea as a method of increasing their sale and income.

If you are not selling more than your associates, then why should they listen to you?

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epollock | Valedictorian

Posted June 24, 2009 at 7:50 PM (Answer #4)

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I don't think you should try to change their behavior. You can still have a great successful business without knowing that information. I don't think most teachers know the history of William Shakespeare but that doesn't mean we still can't teach the richness of the plays. 

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alohaspirit | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Assistant Educator

Posted June 25, 2009 at 2:22 PM (Answer #5)

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Ask them why they work for Gucci?  What is the meaning behind their job?  What is the meaning behind any job?  A lot of the time learning the history of anything makes it more meaningful. History provides insight, and understanding of "What is"  There really is no purpose in working at an institution if you cannot appreciate the beginnings of that institution.  Just tell them "to understand where you are going, you need to understand where you have been" and that goes for anything and everything.  To understand the purpose of your job, and your company you promote, you need to understand why and how it started.

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amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted June 28, 2009 at 4:57 AM (Answer #6)

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Why is it important to you that they know this information?  Would it make them better salespersons?  If so, then request the information yourself and make a display board in the employee workroom.  Make it fun, and ask history-type questions from your display board at the next employee meeting.  Give an incentive to the employee with the correct answer.  Just by hearing these questions and answers over and over, the employees will pick up on some info, the meetings will have a more fun atmosphere, and you will have less stress.

Good Luck!

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Susan Hurn | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted June 30, 2009 at 5:42 AM (Answer #7)

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Are you in a management position, or are your coworkers your peers? Are you all sales associates working in the same store? If that is the case, I would wonder why their behavior is so upsetting to you personally? For instance, does your store have a sales target you have to meet as a team, and you think their approach to sales is holding you back as a team? Without more information, it's difficult to determine the situation you are in.

If you are not in a management position, perhaps you are expending energy worrying about a situation that is not your responsibility. If this is the case, perhaps your time and energy would be better spent focusing on your own efforts to succeed in your job. You seem to be very diligent and committed to doing a great job, but make sure you don't get sidetracked as to what your responsibilities are in your workplace.

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