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With regards to the conversation with Randy, what aspects of this conversation shows...

liammcduff's profile pic

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With regards to the conversation with Randy, what aspects of this conversation shows that Ponyboy still has a lot of maturing to do?

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bullgatortail's profile pic

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Ponyboy has two different conversations with Randy, the Soc who was present on the night his friend, Bob, was killed. During their first conversation, Pony becomes convinced that Randy isn't a Soc--"he's just a guy." It is Pony's first positive experience with a Soc (aside from his friendship with Cherry Valance).

But during their second meeting, Pony is still reeling from the deaths of Johnny and Dallas, and he no longer feels the same about Randy. When Randy volunteers to testify in his behalf and mentions how his father is disappointed in his being "mixed up in all this," Ponyboy

"just looked at him. That was the dumbest remark I ever heard anyone make."

Pony is feeling sorry for himself and his unhappiness is evident. He feels Randy's problems with his own parents are insignificant compared to his own. Pony is also mixed up about the facts of the night of Bob's death, since he has convinced himself that he stabbed the Soc, not Johnny. Even worse, he refuses to admit that Johnny is dead. 

    "Johnny is not dead." My voice was shaking. "Johnny is not dead."

Whether it was immaturity or the effects of a head injury from the rumble, Pony was dealing with the deaths and the upcoming court appearance with one of the stages of grief: denial.

lly34's profile pic

Posted (Answer #2)

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Ponyboy has two different conversations with Randy, the Soc who was present on the night his friend, Bob, was killed. During their first conversation, Pony becomes convinced that Randy isn't a Soc--"he's just a guy." It is Pony's first positive experience with a Soc (aside from his friendship with Cherry Valance).

But during their second meeting, Pony is still reeling from the deaths of Johnny and Dallas, and he no longer feels the same about Randy. When Randy volunteers to testify in his behalf and mentions how his father is disappointed in his being "mixed up in all this," Ponyboy

"just looked at him. That was the dumbest remark I ever heard anyone make."

Pony is feeling sorry for himself and his unhappiness is evident. He feels Randy's problems with his own parents are insignificant compared to his own. Pony is also mixed up about the facts of the night of Bob's death, since he has convinced himself that he stabbed the Soc, not Johnny. Even worse, he refuses to admit that Johnny is dead.

"Johnny is not dead." My voice was shaking. "Johnny is not dead."

Whether it was immaturity or the effects of a head injury from the rumble, Pony was dealing with the deaths and the upcoming court appearance with one of the stages of grief: denial.

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