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Wit as InwardnessWe see Hamlet's clever turn of phrase, as when he tells Polonious to...

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Jamie Wheeler | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

Posted February 11, 2008 at 2:14 PM via web

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Wit as Inwardness

We see Hamlet's clever turn of phrase, as when he tells Polonious to not let his daughter "walk in the sun," (son).  Bloom argues that Hamlet's wit "becomes another another for inwardness" (Invention of the Human, 401).  Where else might you find Hamlet's clever wordplay revealing his more "inward" self? 

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amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted February 12, 2008 at 1:07 PM (Answer #2)

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I love the part in the play when he asks Ophelia if he can lie in her lap (an interesting way to ask if he could become intimate with her), to which she replies "no".  He is toying with her about country matters and his head in her lap...the entire scene is rife with double meanings, which indicates to the audience that perhaps there is an attraction there between them, even though he is putting on an act he knows is expected of him toward Ophelia. 

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