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In Frankenstein, why is it important to the monster that he is being chased?Chapter 24

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manu11 | Student, Grade 10 | eNoter

Posted April 11, 2012 at 1:41 AM via web

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In Frankenstein, why is it important to the monster that he is being chased?

Chapter 24

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literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted May 23, 2012 at 9:30 PM (Answer #1)

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In Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein, the monster's murder of Elizabeth has enraged Victor. No longer in control, Victor swears he will chase the monster until he (Victor) can destroy him. The monster, at one point in chapter seven (volume III), Victor hears "an audible whisper—'I am satisfied: miserable wretch! you have determined to live, and I am satisfied.'” Victor is determined to find vengeance.

Victor's chase of the monster speaks to only one thing: that Victor cares. While his concern lies with the monster's destruction, his concern still lies with the monster. In this sense, one could apply the notion that negative attention is better than no attention.

The monster is finally an object of attention for Victor. His entire life, the monster has desired nothing more than attention and affection from Victor, While the attention and affection is negative, the fact remains that Victor's care for the monster is evident. The importance of Victor's chase of the monster is that the chase shows that Victor cares.

Farewell, Frankenstein! If thou wert yet alive, and yet cherished a desire of revenge against me, it would be better satiated in my life than in my destruction.

Through this statement, made by the monster, readers can see that the monster would rather have Victor chase him for eternity than Victor die. It is only through Victor's life that the monster has any desire to live. Once the monster finds Victor has died, his own desire to live is forgotten.

Victor's death has brought about the monster's death. The chase is no longer able to exist, therefore, neither is the monster.

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