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Why does Scout's attitude change in chapter 26 of To Kill a Mockingbird?

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Why does Scout's attitude change in chapter 26 of To Kill a Mockingbird?

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litteacher8's profile pic

Posted (Answer #1)

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Scout is no longer afraid of the Radley house and Boo Radley.  Instead, she pities him.

Chapter 26 marks an important change in Scout's attitude.

After the trial, life goes on.  Things are slightly different though.  Jem does not have the same schedule as Scout anymore, and even tried out for the football team (where he carries the water).  Scout does not seem to be bothered by Boo Radley, or interested in getting him to come out.

The Radley Place had ceased to terrify me, but it was no less gloomy, no less chilly under its great oaks, and no less uninviting. Mr. Nathan Radley could still be seen on a clear day, walking to and from town… (ch 26)

Scout has matured, and is now more knowledgeable of the world.  She is also more sympathetic.  When she does finally meet Boo Radley, she understands that he is a shy man with a quiet dignity, and she reaches out to him.  When she stands on his porch, she sees the events of her childhood from his perspective.  More than anything else, this demonstrates that she has grown up.  The change in Scout is evident from the beginning of chapter 26 on.

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mlsldy3's profile pic

Posted (Answer #2)

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Scout has matured over the course of the story. Now that the trial is over, everyone thinks that things are getting back to normal. School is back in and Jem has tried out for the football team. Scout is more aware of her surroundings. The trial has changed her. Scout is no longer the young child who was shielded from ugly things. She has now faced the ugliness in the world and seen how people could really be. Scout's attitude is different as well. She no longer fears Boo, and thinks it is ridiculous the things she, Jem and Dill used to do to try to get Boo to come out. 

The Radley Place had ceased to terrify me, but it was no less gloomy, no less chilly under its great oaks, and no less inviting. Mr. Nathan Radley could still be seen on a clear day, walking to and from town, we know Boo was there, for the same old reason-nobody'd seen him carried out yet. I sometimes felt a twinge of remorse, when passing by the old place, at ever having taken part in what must have been sheer torment to Arthur Radley- what reasonable recluse wants children peeping through his shutters, delivering greetings on the end of a fishing-pole, wandering in his collards at night? And yet I remembered. Two Indian-head pennies, chewing gum, soap dolls, a rusty medal, a broken watch and chain.

Scout's attitude is totally different now. She has grown up and realized that the childish games they used to play must have been a horrible time for Boo. Scout is starting to put other's peoples feelings into consideration. Scout doesn't realize it yet, but her new attitude is going to come in handy in the near future.

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