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Point of View in " A Rose For Emily" Why does " A Rose For Emily" seem better...

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shevona | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 5, 2008 at 11:55 AM via web

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Point of View in " A Rose For Emily"

Why does " A Rose For Emily" seem better told

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ms-mcgregor | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted October 5, 2008 at 12:07 PM (Answer #2)

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From a narrative point of view, a townsperson is unable to see the events as Emily sees them. If Emily told the story, she would have to reveal the murder of Homer and her subsequent behavior towards him. A townsperson is able to present the clues for the reader and allow the reader to draw his/her own conclusions before discovering the shocking ending. Since our imagination is often more graphic that the real description of events, the horror of the story is heightened by allowing us to discover the truth at the same time as the rest of the town. It also allows the author to show the town and the Southern values of the town instead of those of Emily, whose mind is obviously twisted.

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catharinek | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted October 6, 2008 at 12:22 PM (Answer #3)

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Faulkner writes about the South, and the enablers the townspeople become. While it is true that if Emily told the story the reader would not be surrounded by the mystery and gothic quality that the unnamed narrator creates, the unnamed narrator helps the reader understand the town's hand in Homer's murder.

The narrator is able to tell the story as the "town" knows it. What the town knows is that Emily's father ran off all of her suitors for selfish reasons. The reader also learns that Emily buys arsenic from the pharmacist and won't tell him why she wants it. Then the narrator explains the terrible stench coming from the house not long after Homer disappears. Finally, when the townspeople open the door, no one is truly shocked at what they find. This shows that the town had a good idea all along about what happened to Homer. In a sense, the town enables Emily's crime. This idea of knowing and not speaking is a part of Southern Gothic. If Faulkner had Emily tell the story, the reader would not have seen this or understood how the town is also a characater in the story.

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pmiranda2857 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted October 7, 2008 at 2:56 PM (Answer #4)

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The narrator has more information about Miss Emily, her father and the town that the main character would ever reveal to the reader.

When a main character is the narrator, the story is told from a particular perspective, in this case, we would probably be even more sympathetic towards Emily than we are through the narrator's version.

We certainly would get to know Miss Emily's heart better.  The story does not give us insight into her thinking, only that we assume she murdered Homer Barron so that he would never leave her.  We don't get to hear Emily's thoughts through the narrator, that would be a nice touch. 

But the essence of horror would be minimized if Miss Emily told the story, we would see the whole experience through her eyes, she would probably rationalize her behavior.  

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kwoo1213 | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

Posted October 8, 2008 at 12:34 AM (Answer #5)

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The narrator is not judgmental towards Miss Emily, which is essential to the meaning of this story.  While the narrator does report what OTHERS say about Miss Emily, he does not pass judgment on her.  He reserves that for the reader to do.  By using this narrator, Faulkner is able to evoke sympathy for Miss Emily.

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tdot-teacher | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted October 12, 2008 at 6:12 AM (Answer #6)

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The unnamed narrator achieves two purposes. First, it allows Faulkner to establish the townspeople as the "collective" through which the reader learns about this enigma named Miss Emily. If Faulkner established a particular narrator (either first- or third- person) who is defined, much of the narrative quality would be lost because the perspective would be significantly limited. If nothing else, the reader is meant to sympathize with Miss Emily, and limiting the narrative voice would significantly hinder this purpose. Second, having the narrator unnamed allows the reader the opportunity to enjoy the perspective of the townspeople who all attempt to understand Miss Emily without quite capturing the entire truth. As readers, we are left with bits and pieces of her life, told piecemeal in a non-chronological order, quite similar to the way in which the townspeople of Jefferson must approach her.

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Susan Hurn | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted January 16, 2009 at 6:19 PM (Answer #7)

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The narrator has more information about Miss Emily, her father and the town that the main character would ever reveal to the reader.

When a main character is the narrator, the story is told from a particular perspective, in this case, we would probably be even more sympathetic towards Emily than we are through the narrator's version.

We certainly would get to know Miss Emily's heart better.  The story does not give us insight into her thinking, only that we assume she murdered Homer Barron so that he would never leave her.  We don't get to hear Emily's thoughts through the narrator, that would be a nice touch. 

But the essence of horror would be minimized if Miss Emily told the story, we would see the whole experience through her eyes, she would probably rationalize her behavior.  

The point of view of a story is the most important decision a writer makes. It determines which story is told. Emily's version of the events would be quite different from someone else's version. Any person in the town would tell the story from his own experiences with Emily and his own attitudes toward her. By choosing a narrator who is not a part of the town, Faulker is able to achieve several things.

He can characterize the town in addition to developing Emily's character. The town itself becomes a character in the story. This says a lot about the nature of the small Southern town as Faulkner saw it: not a collection of independent individuals, but as a unified force of culture and tradition (group think).

By using the objective narrator, Faulkner is able to maintain the suspense of the story. The reader doesn't learn the story all at once because the narrator did not learn it that way.

Faulkner's narrator tells the story in a disjointed way, not in chronological order. He gives the reader clues, out of order. As the reader starts putting the clues together, a growing sense of horror develops.

Finally, Faulkner's narrator, as an outsider, is nonjudgmental. This makes it possible to preserve the possibility that the reader can develop some sympathy for Emily, despite her terrible act.

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ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted April 22, 2010 at 3:50 PM (Answer #8)

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Great points everyone’s made about the third person narrator. Having complete freedom to look into the story and construct our own meaning is one of the things that makes the story so fascinating. Imagine what a different story it would be if Emily told it. We either wouldn’t know the truth (because she would hide it), or we’d be so unnerved by her admissions that we would have no sympathy for her. Faulkner crafted wisely so our empathy could remain intact.

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lfawley | College Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted April 22, 2010 at 3:55 PM (Answer #9)

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I agree with the above poster as the narrator allows each and every one of us, as readers, to be a member of the town in a way. Faulkner makes you feel as though you have just moved to town and you are getting the inside scoop on the skeletons in the town's closet. I think this perspective allows us, as readers, the freedom to make our own determinations about both the town and about Emily. The fact that the story becomes a bit of a horror tale makes it even more interesting because we are left wondering why we were made priivy to all of this in the first place.

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luvnie92 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 26, 2011 at 4:14 AM (Answer #10)

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what a bout the the protoganist of emily in part 4?

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