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Why doesn't the narrator reveal the main conflict till most until a great deal of the...

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janekaliramir | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted September 14, 2010 at 2:39 AM via web

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Why doesn't the narrator reveal the main conflict till most until a great deal of the story has passed?

why has this question been closed when the character development is not discussed?  Can we not get more than one answer?

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted September 14, 2010 at 2:50 AM (Answer #1)

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In my opinion, the author does this because he wants to show us something about Rainsford's personality and his beliefs.  I think he does this because the story is partly about how Rainsford's experiences affect (or do not affect) his beliefs.

By having the main conflict start so late, the author is able to show us more about what Rainsford is like before he gets hunted.  We see, for example, that he has no sympathy for the animals he has hunted.  But we also see that he thinks that the idea of hunting people is totally abhorrent.  Because we get this detailed view of his opinions, the rest of the story becomes more interesting.  It especially makes us very curious as to what the ending implies.  What will Rainsford do now that he has killed Zaroff -- will he stick to his values or will he do what Zaroff had been doing?

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