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Why does Jem say Boo Radley must not be at home? What is ironic about this? Does he...

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banana18 | Student, Grade 11 | eNotes Newbie

Posted April 20, 2009 at 7:01 AM via web

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Why does Jem say Boo Radley must not be at home? What is ironic about this? Does he mean it? Why is it important for the kids for Boo not to be home?

The question deals with chapter 28.

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lhc | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted April 21, 2009 at 8:50 AM (Answer #1)

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It's important to the kids to know Boo is gone, because they are walking alone on a moonless night, and they're slightly spooked, Scout remarking, "It (the Radley home) is a scary place though, ain't it?  Boo doesn't mean anybody any harm but I'm right glad you're along."  Jem then goes on to re-state that Boo must not be home because a mockingbird is singing in the tree in front of the Radley house, "in blissful unawareness of whose tree he sat in."  The irony of this development in the plot is that Boo Radley has been nowhere but home for years, and that the mockingbird becomes a symbol for Boo Radley after he saves the children from Ewell's attack.

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acrivera | TA , Grade 8 | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 20, 2014 at 2:58 PM (Answer #2)

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It's important to the kids to know Boo is gone, because they are walking alone on a moonless night, and they're slightly spooked.

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