Homework Help

Why does Jefferson reiterate that every peaceful measure has been done to catch the...

user profile pic

jboggins | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted August 14, 2008 at 8:13 AM via web

dislike 1 like

Why does Jefferson reiterate that every peaceful measure has been done to catch the King’s attention?

Explain the language that Jefferson uses to reiterate the idea that colonial independence was caused by the king, not the colonies.

1 Answer | Add Yours

user profile pic

dbello | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted August 14, 2008 at 9:10 AM (Answer #1)

dislike 0 like

The reasoning behind Jefferson's intentions were to "spell" out why the separation was imminent.The document is usually viewed in three distinct parts.The principles and purpose of government, a list of complaints or grievences that the colonists held the king accountable for, and a declaration of war.The beauty of Jefferson's writing is in its style.The colonial grievences read like a "to do" list.Jefferson was deliberately using this manner of writing creating a very repetative sound in the mind of the reader. The document was intended to be one-sided, with the subtle reminder that the colonists tried their very best to remain loyal to the crown. Jefferson intentionally laid the blame at the feet of the king, as to not alienate the British people. He realized all too well if a new nation was born it would need all friends it could get. It must be understood that Jefferson realized that this document would be read by every nation, so it was imperative that everyone would 'hear" the words. The way he documents the tyranny of the king directly to the king, and with those same words created a very powerful editorial for the rest of the world to sympathize with the good people of the new United States. The political ramifications of what was about to happen in 1776 required an air tight argument, Jefferson gave that argument.

Join to answer this question

Join a community of thousands of dedicated teachers and students.

Join eNotes