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Why does Henry Dobbins say: "Dance right" at the end of story titled "Style"?

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zvezdana | eNotes Newbie

Posted June 20, 2012 at 8:25 AM via web

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Why does Henry Dobbins say: "Dance right" at the end of story titled "Style"?

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mizzwillie | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted July 9, 2012 at 12:39 PM (Answer #1)

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In the story "Style" in the novel The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien, the troop comes upon a village where a young girl is dancing with a dreamy expression on her face.  She is dancing with her dead family around her.  When Azar, a troubled young soldier, makes fun of the girl's dancing, Henry Dobbins teaches the young soldier not to make fun of someone who has lost everything except her life.  Henry's comment to Azar to "Dance right" is saying to Azar that what Azar was doing with his mocking dance was wrong, and that if he wants to dance, dance right without making fun of the girl.  The incident also shows the theme of war and love because Henry wants Azar to learn to do the right thing even in a war zone.

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