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Why did I get waitlisted at a school I am overly qualified for? Could there have been...

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telk | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted March 26, 2012 at 5:45 AM via web

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Why did I get waitlisted at a school I am overly qualified for? Could there have been weak points in my application that I am unaware of?

Why did I get waitlisted at a school I am overly qualified for? Could there have been weak points in my application that I am unaware of?

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thanatassa | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted March 26, 2012 at 5:36 AM (Answer #2)

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The first thing to understand about college and university admissions is that it is not all about you. A school has a certain number of places available and a certain applicant pool and the job of the admissions staff is to match the applicant pool with places available. In a year with more qualified applicants than there are places, that means that the admissions staff must select the best of the applicants that meet the minimum qualifications; in years with a weaker pool, less qualified applicants may be admitted.

Also, many factors other than simple GPA and ACT/SAT scores may affect admissions. For example, if two students have the same scores, but one is an extremely talented musician or outstanding at sports or has been really active in community service, and the other applicant has just met the minimal numeric qualifications without the strong extracurriculars, that second candidate will be less likely to be admitted.

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kiwi | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted March 26, 2012 at 5:48 AM (Answer #3)

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Perhaps the school is questioning why you applied for somewhere you are over-qualified for. They may perceive your application is a fall back option, and if there is lots of competition as the earlier post highlighted, you may not look like a serious applicant. 

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rrteacher | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted March 26, 2012 at 6:08 AM (Answer #4)

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Any of the above options are possible. I would, however, advise you not to give up hope- I have known many students who got in schools after being waitlisted. But in many cases, it does simply depend on the number of applications, and it is difficult to know whether this is one of those cases. Again, my advice would be above all to hang in there- they don't put students they wouldn't admit on waitlists. 

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted March 26, 2012 at 6:22 AM (Answer #5)

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It could be (if this is a less expensive college) that many people are applying because they're worried about paying higher tuition at more competitive schools. That makes the pool of applicants "better" than it has been in past years and makes this school more competitive.

Is your feeling that you're overqualified based solely on GPA and test scores or is there more?

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clairewait | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted March 26, 2012 at 8:04 AM (Answer #6)

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Another point is that you are not being considered against a written standard, but against all the other students who applied this term.  It is also possible that they simply ranked applications in order of best to worst, and yours fell below the allotted cut off line.



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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted March 26, 2012 at 9:55 AM (Answer #7)

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You may think you are overly qualified, but there is no real way to tell.  College admissions is a complicated thing.  Although you may think that you are overly qualified, the school might have had many applicants who ranked higher than you.  You should always do your best when applying to any college.  Even if your scores are higher than most previous applicants, sometimes there are more applicants the next year that are in general more highly qualified.  You are being compared to everyone else who applied with you!

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wannam | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted March 26, 2012 at 11:22 PM (Answer #8)

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It is difficult to say you are overqualified for a school.  As the above posts point out, the term qualified is somewhat dependent on the applicant pool.  In the current economy, many students that would normally apply to more expensive schools are now applying to less expensive and state supported schools.  The competition over admissions has certainly gone up.  A waiting list does not necessarily mean you will not be admitted to that school.  It just means they have currently offered all their available slots.  If you were not qualified to attend, they would have rejected you outright rather than put you on their wait list.  It is still very early in the year.  The chances of the situation at your particular school changing between now and the start of next term are very high.

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lmetcalf | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted March 26, 2012 at 11:50 PM (Answer #9)

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As others have noted, the admissions process is usually more complicated than merely the GPA/SAT numbers, and even though you may have higher numbers than their admissions policy suggests as their minimum that doesn't mean that you have the numbers to keep you as competitive as many other students who also applied. If this is a smaller school, then there is also the more subjective considerations such as the quality of your college application essays, your resume, and your letters of recommendation that could have come into play.

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tinicraw | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted March 28, 2012 at 1:26 AM (Answer #10)

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I've also heard that colleges must meet certain minority quotas in order to receive certain funding.  I hate to say it, but maybe it's racial, cultural, or sexual.  Maybe they need to have 10 more female students next year and there were too many male applicants. That happened to my brother with law school.  He was too specific and should have branched out to other schools, but after some research, he found that being a white male these days can be tougher with colleges having to meet strict discrimination laws.  Interesting, eh?

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telk | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted April 27, 2012 at 12:55 AM (Answer #11)

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Ah ok, thank you very much for all of your inputs, its very helpful. I agree, overqualified may be an overstatement. The acceptance rate at this school is 43%, and I am also applying as a white male out of state, which perhaps hurts my chances. My GPA and SATs are far above their average, however I understand that this does not mean everything. From what I can tell my letters of rec are very good, and I am involved in alot of extracurriculars and 1 varsity sport at my high school. I had no really strong extracurricular or sport, its more of I just did alot of broad stuff, never too serious about one thing, which may be a flaw. I guess I was really looking for an explicit answer that I should have known didn't really exist, like I didn't do something right on the comman app or they found some flaw or problem with the information I provided. Thanks again for all of your posts.

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