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Why does George kill Lennie in "Of Mice and Men"?

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crusaderofcha... | Student, Grade 9 | eNoter

Posted October 15, 2008 at 11:27 PM via web

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Why does George kill Lennie in "Of Mice and Men"?

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cybil | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted October 15, 2008 at 11:37 PM (Answer #1)

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George kills Lennie by shooting him in the back of the head to save him from a more painful death at the hands of Curley, who has vowed to make him suffer for the death of his wife. George loves his friend Lennie, whom he has looked after faithfully, and he doesn't want Lennie to die horribly, especially since Lennie has unwittingly taken the life of Curley's wife in much the same way as he petted the puppy too hard or squeezed the mice to death. Lennie didn't know his own strength. When Curley's wife screamed, he didn't know how to make her stop except to do what he did, but he did not intend to kill her.

Curley, of course, is also looking for a way to achieve revenge for Lennie's crushing his hand, so he will definitely try to kill Lennie in the most cruel way possible. He says he will "gut shoot" him. George must save his friend by a mercy killing.

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may-li | Student, Grade 10 | Salutatorian

Posted December 18, 2008 at 1:39 AM (Answer #6)

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In of mice and men, we must register the number of cycles that can be perceived. The reader may ask himself, why did George kill Lennie now and not run away like they did in Weed?

However, the reader is not so sure anymore about what really happened in Weed. This is a style technique Steinbeck uses which is to force the reader to reflect. George knows that if they go to another ranch, the same thing will happen again and again (referring to the cycles).

Therefore, George not only killed Lennie out of mercy but also because he knows that they will never attain their dream and that he would rather kill Lennie at a moment when he was at peace and happy then risk another time.

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roweeee92 | Student, Grade 11 | Honors

Posted October 27, 2008 at 7:36 AM (Answer #3)

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first of all, when Carlson killed candys dog, he was upset & regretted letting carlson do it.

 So when George knew that Lennie was going to die, he felt that it would be better if he did it himself. This way, he wouldn't have the burden that he just let lennie get shot.

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freshmenrule | Student, Grade 9 | Honors

Posted August 19, 2010 at 6:33 AM (Answer #7)

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I believe that George shot him in the back of the head to make it a painless death refering to when Carlson was explaining that if he shot Candy's dog in the back of the head he wouldn't feel it at all.. As for why he did it.. He thought that it would be better for him (George) His best friend should do it rather than being Curley or one of the others.

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bharathrajendran | Student, Grade 9 | Honors

Posted October 11, 2010 at 8:59 PM (Answer #8)

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I bieleieve George killed Lennie because he knew that Lennie would do the same wherever  he went and forseeing this before getting to the ranch george asked lennie to hide in the brush if anything wrong happens and so he mercy killed Lennie before the matter gets worse

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apierce1972 | Honors

Posted April 2, 2012 at 6:27 AM (Answer #19)

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He kills him out of love.  Since Lennie accidentally killed Curley's wife, George knows that there is no way to save him now.  Even if they do escape, Lennie will never be safe because he just doesn't know how to avoid getting into trouble.  Furthermore, if Curley gets his hands on Lennie, he will make his revenge be slow, terrifying, and painful.  Therefore, George knows that the only way to protect Lennie is to shoot him.

George's choice of shooting Lennie in the back of the head (behind the ear) is a direct link to the shooting of Curley's dog earlier in the book.  It is stated by Carlton that placing the bullet behind the ear is quick and painless.  When Candy joins up with George and Lennie later, he states that he should have killed his dog instead of letting a stranger do it.  All of this contributes to why and how George kills Lennie: to protect him from pain and out of being close to him (i.e. out of love).

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samtyler | Student, Grade 9 | Honors

Posted November 26, 2011 at 9:31 AM (Answer #10)

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george killed lennie because he loved his friend. he doesn't want him to be tortured and then die. he knew that he didnt kill curely's wife on purpose but he couldn't help it. he didn't know how much strength he has in himself. alsolennie died peacefully.

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agent21 | Student, Grade 11 | Honors

Posted March 17, 2012 at 9:14 PM (Answer #18)

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To save him froa more panifull and brutall death. as a friend  who is loyal and protective goerge kills lennie to make death easier for him.

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William Delaney | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted August 28, 2012 at 11:48 PM (Answer #21)

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There seems to be a correlation between Carlson's shooting Candy's old dog and George shooting Lennie. Steinbeck planned to have George kill Lennie--but he had to have a gun. The episode with Carlson shooting the dog serves a dual purpose. It establishes that Carlson owns a gun, a Luger pistol. Steinbeck devotes a whole paragraph and some additional exposition to describing what Carlson does with it after shooting the dog and returning to the bunkhouse. Finally:

Carlson finished the cleaning of the gun and put it in the bag and pushed the bag under his bunk.

This is what in Hollywood parlance is called a "plant." It establishes that there is a gun available and that George knows exactly where it is. He has also seen Carlson working the mechanism of this foreign handgun, so he will understand how to inject a cartridge into the chamber. George, of course, does not plan to shoot Lennie at that time, but he will remember that Luger when he makes the decision to kill his friend.

The whole description of Carlson's Luger can be considered foreshadowing. The reader senses that the gun will appear again somewhere in the story.

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sandhyapandey | Student | Honors

Posted February 27, 2012 at 10:25 AM (Answer #14)

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In the beginning of the story Candy regretted not killing his dog, because he should have been the first one not Carlson. So George thought it was the right thing to do and ccurley wanted to shoot lennie in the guts so it would be long and painful.
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mmcentire | Middle School Teacher | eNoter

Posted July 12, 2012 at 11:49 AM (Answer #20)

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This is the ultimate sacrifice George made for a friend. Their long abiding friendship is depicted throughout the book. Even in the face of cruelty by others to Lennie, George tries to help his friend. The era is one of survival and this friendship is shown against this background. George protects his friend by shootog him and saving him from the torture of others. This is much like the kindness we show animals. 

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islaydragons | Student, Undergraduate | Honors

Posted February 14, 2012 at 10:47 PM (Answer #11)

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Because the other men was going to kill him for killing the young woman

 

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amne | Student, Undergraduate | Salutatorian

Posted February 17, 2012 at 11:58 PM (Answer #12)

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George killed Lennie to save him the torture that he was going to get.

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athawa | Student, Grade 10 | eNoter

Posted February 26, 2012 at 7:28 AM (Answer #13)

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georhe kills lennie form the torture he would get and refering to slims puppy when he said i should of killed him to save him from the disease he was suffering

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awesomebee | Student, Grade 10 | eNoter

Posted March 10, 2012 at 8:03 PM (Answer #17)

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Because lennie was ill fitted to be alive and it was best for him to die.

 

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user3014289 | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 30, 2013 at 12:20 AM (Answer #22)

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Here is an exerpt from my essay. This is my paragraph telling why Lennie had to die  

Last but certainly not least, is how Lennie dying is justifiable. Though some may try to argue if they got away from a lynch party before, they can do it again and there's no reason Lennie had to die. What's being completely overlooked in that argument is the fact that in Weed, Lennie only grabbed a lady's dress whereas now, he killed a woman... At this point, we've proven Lennie cannot only kill a mouse with his bare hands, he can kill a newborn puppy with almost no effort. This only foreshadows the death of Curley's wife as does the phrase, “she's trouble,” which is stated in varying fashions by multiple men. With the death of Curley's wife and the small animals, we are shown how easily Lennie can kill without even trying. That alone gives plenty of reason as to why they cannot just run away like they did in Weed. Also, when Crooks is taunting Lennie and teasing him about George not coming back, he tells him, “Want me to tell ya what'll happen? They'll take ya to the booby hatch. They'll tie ya up with a collar, like a dog” (72). As it's common knowledge, that is no way for a human to be treated. The last thing that justifies Lennie's death, is when one ponders the idea of the guys actually getting the ranch. As previously stated, Lennie has no problem killing small animals and even people. If one were to imagine Lennie on a ranch with a bunch of animals, especially with small ones like rabbits, no matter how Candy crunched the numbers, there would be no way they could make profit off of the rabbits given the projected amount of rabbits Lennie would kill. That's just pretending getting the ranch was even an attainable goal in the first place. “I think I knowed from the very first. I think I knowed we'd never do her. He usta like to hear about it so much I got to thinking maybe we would” (94), states George who, after Lennie's death, realizes there really was no chance of them getting the ranch.

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maria-vivanco | TA , Grade 11 | Valedictorian

Posted January 17, 2014 at 8:39 PM (Answer #23)

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George always looked out for Lennie and in the end, when everyone is looking for Lennie and George is 'leading the way." He wanted it to be him that killed him, as for he would've done it quick. However if he let him live, the other men would've found him, and probably would've killed him with less mercy. He would've had to watch his best friend get killed. 

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Yojana_Thapa | TA , Grade 10 | Valedictorian

Posted January 25, 2014 at 11:14 PM (Answer #24)

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George killed Lennie because he loved him. He felt that it was better for himself to kill him than any other person. He killed him to save him!

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parama9000 | TA , Grade 11 | Valedictorian

Posted January 26, 2014 at 12:56 PM (Answer #25)

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Yes. In the finest sense, it was mercy killing. This is for George to never live to the moment when Lennie dies at the hands of Curley in the most merciless sense. George sympathizes with Lennie as he never gets a good grip on his strength and does not want him to suffer such a painful and wrongful death.

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Chantelm | TA , Grade 10 | Salutatorian

Posted February 1, 2014 at 6:43 AM (Answer #26)

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Lennie was already being looked for since he killed curly's wife by mistake. If George didn't kill him someone else would've ended up killing him. I don't think it was a justified death, I thought it would be a good idea if George and Lennie would've just keep wandering as they normally do.

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nisarg | TA , Kindergarten | Valedictorian

Posted June 18, 2014 at 2:01 AM (Answer #27)

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In John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men,Lennie is a mentally challenged and strong migrant worker who travels with George, his smart friend. When the body of Curley’s wife was found at their new place of work, everyone knew Lennie had done it. Curley and the other men went to find, lynch, and kill Lennie. George knew that Lennie was by the pond and he went there told Lennie to look to the hills and imagine their farm. While Lennie was looking away George gave the final blow. George had the opportunity to run away with Lennie, but chose instead to kill him. The reason for this was to make sure that Lennie died happy. Lennie would soon be found, punished, and killed by the other men so George had to make the decision to end Lennie quickly. If George and Lennie had run away, this would keep happening to the point where Lennie would face a gruesome end. The reader knows this because Lennie had done the same with a woman’s red dress and the puppy. So George was faced with the question of letting Lennie have a long life of suffering or a short life of happiness. George made the right decision to let Lennie die dreaming about his farm. Like Candy’s dog, Lennie was beginning to hurt himself and it would be cruel to let him suffer more. Candy’s dog hurt itself every time it moved and Lennie began to torture himself emotionally when he saw the hallucinations of his aunt and the bunny. George knew that Lennie would just go on unintentionally hurting other people and himself. George made the right decision in putting Lennie down. However, he had to live with his decision for his entire life. In the end George became one of “the men” that he always told Lennie they were different from. 

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crystaltu001 | TA , Grade 10 | Valedictorian

Posted July 6, 2014 at 7:23 AM (Answer #28)

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George killed Lennie because Lennie killed Curley's wife and George didn't want Lennie to suffer when Curley finds him so he kills him instead

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William Delaney | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted July 6, 2014 at 3:00 PM (Answer #29)

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George kills Lennie for multiple reasons.

  •       The reason most commonly offered is that George wants to save Lennie from being tortured by the pursuing lynch mob. This is probably valid, but it does not explain why he doesn’t help Lennie escape. Lennie is hiding on the bank of a shallow river. The two men could wade across the river and climb into the Gabilan Mountains. The lynch mob might never even think of looking for them up there. Even if the mob finally guessed they had fled into the mountains, George and Lennie would have too much of a head start, and it would soon be getting dark. According to Lennie, the mountains have many caves. A mob would have to search each cave, and in the meantime the fugitives could be getting farther away.
  •         George didn’t intend to help Lennie escape. This is proved conclusively by the fact that he stole Carlson’s Luger from under his bunk at the ranch. He intended to kill Lennie as painlessly as possible, just as he had seen Carlson kill Candy's dog with a single shot. When George saw the body of Curley’s wife in the barn, he assumed, like all the other men, that Lennie had tried to rape her and had unintentionally killed her while they were struggling. George realizes that Lennie is becoming a menace to society and that he would probably kill other girls if allowed to live in freedom.
  •         This is the first time Lennie has killed a human being (although he has killed lots of animals). George is in some danger of being charged as an accessory to second-degree homicide. He told Lennie where to hide if he got into trouble. If he tried to help his friend escape, he would definitely be an accessory to murder. George is also potentially in double-trouble. Curley suspects him of helping Lennie escape and telling him where to go. The police could arrest George just because he was a friend of Lennie and was responsible for Lennie's behavior. If they couldn't catch Lennie they might turn on George--either the lynch mob or the police, or both. After all, George was not responsible for what Lennie did in the town of Weed, and yet George's life was equally in jeopardy. George is getting fed up with being tied to an irresponsible man who could get him killed. Many of us have had the experience of deciding to break off relations with a friend who keeps causing us trouble. There are plenty of such people!
  •         George feels guilty for the death of Curley’s wife. In fact, he really is guilty because he brought Lennie to that ranch and the girl would still be alive if he hadn’t brought Lennie there. He is Lennie’s caretaker. He is responsible for any kind of trouble Lennie gets into—and he is beginning to realize that Lennie is growing into more of a problem than he is competent to handle.
  •         George wants to rid himself of a big burden. He can’t handle the stress anymore. When he kills Lennie with the Luger he has mixed feelings, which include pity, sorrow, and remorse, but also a vast relief. He frequently abuses Lennie verbally, telling the childish giant that he could enjoy a much happier life if only he were free of him. Lennie is a burden because he is always getting into trouble and also because he has to be watched all the time. Lennie has caused George to lose jobs, and jobs are hard to come by. Lennie almost got both of them lynched by assaulting a girl in Weed.
  •         George is angry at Lennie. He feels sorry for Curley’s dead wife. She was just a dumb girl. She should have had a chance to live out her whole life and not have it snuffed out the way Lennie had killed his puppy and so many other small animals. George kills Lennie for the same reason that the lynch mob wants to kill him. George is really fed up with his companion.
  •         George can’t turn Lennie over to the authorities with the hope that they would put him in an asylum. He doesn’t have the power to determine Lennie’s fate. If he could manage to get Lennie arrested rather than lynched, the authorities would be likely to charge Lennie with murder. There would be plenty of evidence that he had killed Curley’s wife, and there would be plenty of witnesses to testify that he was guilty. The motive would be attempted rape. Nobody saw what happened in the barn. Lennie would be incapable of defending himself, and he wouldn’t have much of a defense anyway. He wouldn’t let go of the girl, she started screaming and struggling, and he killed her.
  •         Lennie is showing many signs of rebelling against George’s control. He lies to George, threatens to run away and live by himself, doesn’t follow George’s instructions, sometimes deliberately disobeys. (For example, George told him to have nothing to do with Curley’s wife.) George may be a little bit afraid of Lennie, and with good reason. A time might come when Lennie might “accidentally” kill his keeper.

Steinbeck was a realist. His characters are not all good or all bad. George shows his good side by looking after Lennie for a long time. He shows his darker side by verbally abusing Lennie, by wanting to be rid of him, and finally by executing him. Lennie himself seems like a gentle, likeable character—except that he kills everything he touches, including his little puppy. Lennie is developing an interest in sex, and because of his feeble mind and giant strength he is potentially a monster who needs to be destroyed.  Slim is probably the most faultless character in the story, but he is a member of the lynch mob. He wouldn’t be present at the ending if he hadn’t come along with the mob. And there is no indication that he had any intention of giving Lennie any kind of help.

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nazzy | Student, Grade 10 | eNoter

Posted November 25, 2008 at 2:40 AM (Answer #4)

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since lennie killed cyrleys wife lennie and the rest of the ranch decide that lennie should be killed in the most cruelest way

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