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In William Golding's novel Lord of the Flies, who was most affected by Piggy's death?

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angelface97 | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted February 24, 2012 at 1:42 AM via web

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In William Golding's novel Lord of the Flies, who was most affected by Piggy's death?

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pearl7391 | Student , Undergraduate | Honors

Posted March 14, 2012 at 12:41 PM (Answer #1)

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It was Ralph who was most affected by Piggy's death as Piggy was his chief supporter. Piggy was the voice of democracy and clear understanding, in Golding's novel. In spite of his physical short-sightedness Piggy was very much discrete in his disposition and a boy of scientific temperment. Piggy always helped Ralph in each and every step of their marooned life on the tropical island about which they had no idea. It was Piggy who helped Ralph in forming a code of conduct to maintain themselves as an organised group.

Therefore, when Piggy was murdered savagely, the voice of democracy was suppressed. Ralph found himself helpless and was deserted by his followers, one by one and ultimately was hounded to death by Jack's tribe.

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Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted July 4, 2013 at 7:37 PM (Answer #2)

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William Golding's novel Lord of the Flies is set on a tropical island, and the characters are all English schoolboys who have been stranded there during an airplane crash. Over the course of the novel, these boys become more uncivilized because they have no restrictions or authorities to keep them from becoming savages.

As the answer above states, Ralph is the character who is most affected by Piggy's death. Despite their strained relationship in the beginning, Ralph and Piggy grow quite close over the course of the novel. As Ralph begins to lose his ability to think, he relies on Piggy to help him. When the hunters steal Piggy's glasses, Ralph is outraged and follows Piggy to reclaim them.

Once Piggy is killed, though, Ralph becomes acutely aware that he is the next target for the savages. Immediately Jack screams and runs toward Ralph.

Viciously, with full intention, he hurled his spear at Ralph. The point tore the skin and flesh over Ralph’s ribs, then sheared off and fell in the water. Ralph stumbled, feeling not pain but panic, and the tribe, screaming now like the chief, began to advance. Another spear, a bent one that would not fly straight, went past his face and one fell from on high where Roger was. The twins lay hidden behind the tribe and the anonymous devils’ faces swarmed across the neck. Ralph turned and ran.

Now that Piggy is gone, Ralph's life is in danger; that makes him the person most affected by Piggy's death. 

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