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Who was the first Muslim Governor of the Punjab province, of India (now partially in...

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homin007 | Student, Undergraduate | Salutatorian

Posted September 8, 2012 at 2:39 AM via web

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Who was the first Muslim Governor of the Punjab province, of India (now partially in Pakistan)? Were all the Governors Britishers?

I'd like to know if a Muslim native ever held this very prestigious charge prior to Sardar Abdul Rab Nishtar. I know he replaced Sir Francis Mudie in 1948-49 (in other words after creation of independent Pakistan) but I want to know about the almost 100 years of British colonial rule before that, if there was any native, even a Hindu or Sikh, or not who held the office.

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iklan100 | College Teacher | Valedictorian

Posted September 8, 2012 at 3:47 AM (Answer #1)

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Hello. The Punjab area was formally annexed by the British East India Company's administration in March 1849, after the defeat of the former Sikh rulers of that province. From 1849 onwards till partition/independence in August 1947, when India and Pakistan emerged as 2 separate entities out of British India, the 'united Punjab' (it was later as you might know split in two, a part given over to India and part to Pakistan) had around 30 'Lieutenant-Governors' and 'Governors'-- please see List below-- and of these, with only one notable exception all the rest were British/english officers.

The one exception was a Punjabi Muslim, actually, neither an Hindu nor Sikh-- the late Capt. Sardar Sir Sikandar Hayat Khan, KCSI, KCIE, KB, DLitt etc (1892-1942), one of the most distinguished statesman from the Punjab ever, in recent times. He served as governor of Punjab twice i.e. in 1932 and then again in 1934; and later on, from 1937 to 1942, he also served as the head of the Punjabi Unionist Party and first Premier/Prime Minister of this province. Further details of his career are given below. Indeed, he was truly a man above narrow communal politics and in all his roles, the gubernatorial and the ministerial, he did a lot for the people of what was then one Punjab, regardless of creed or caste etc.

After 1947 of course, Indian Punjab has had it's own governors and Pakistan, it's own, too, of which as you rightly point out, Sir Francis Mudie replaced Sir Evan Jenkins in 1947 August and was then later replaced by Abdur Rab Nishtar, and all Pakistani-Punjabi governors have been Muslims since.


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