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  In "Of Mice and Men," out of anger, what does Lennie do to the puppy?  

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helper12345678 | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted March 2, 2011 at 11:18 AM via web

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In "Of Mice and Men," out of anger, what does Lennie do to the puppy?

 

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michellepaints | (Level 2) eNoter

Posted March 6, 2011 at 5:18 AM (Answer #1)

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Lennie is petting his puppy and when it accidentally bites him, he smacks it a little too hard and unintentionally kills it.   He doesn't do anything to the other pups in anger, but he is angry that the puppy has died.  He directs his anger verbally at the dead pup and says that when George finds out it died, he won't allow Lennie to look after the rabbits in the home they've been dreaming about.   Lennie is torn between remorse, grief and anger and is in the grip of his emotions when Curly's wife comes into the barn, which sets in motion the pivotal moment of the book (when Lennie accidentally kills her to keep her from crying out and getting him into more trouble).

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literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted June 3, 2011 at 6:29 AM (Answer #2)

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Lennie, from John Stienbeck's Of Mice and Men, never actually does anything to the puppies out of anger.  In reality, Lennie is simply wanting to play with the puppies.  He, unfortunately, does not his own strength, or how to handle puppies, and kills the one given to him.  After killing the puppy, Lennie does, in fact, get angry at the puppy for dying.  The death of the puppy, for Lennie symbolizes the death of his dream to tend to the rabbits at the ranch he and George wish to have.  George had told Lennie that if he got into any more trouble that he would not be able to tend to the rabbits on the ranch and Lennie sees the death of the puppy as the end to his own dream.

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