Where and when in Romeo and Juliet does Juliet express her inner conflict?What are the quotes to back up these ideas?

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wannam | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

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In Romeo and Juliet, Juliet's main inner conflict begins in act one scene five. Juliet is informed by the nurse that she has been flirting with Romeo, a Montague. She states, "my only love sprung from my only hate." This conflict continues in act two scene two as Juliet tries to ascertain the extent of Romeo's love. By act three, Romeo and Juliet are married and Juliet happily waits for their first night together. Her happiness quickly dissipates after she learns that Romeo has killed Tybalt. This leads back to Juliet's inner struggles between her love for Romeo and her loyalty for her family. In act two scene two lines 72-84, Juliet calls Romeo a list of horrible names. Then, by line 94, she shifts her tone and remembers her love for him. Her speeches in this act are probably some of the most poignant examples of inner conflict. Her inner struggles between Romeo and her family continue with her fathers attempts to marry her to Count Paris. We see her desperation increase in act four scene one as she threatens to commit suicide in front of the friar. This conflict is not concluded until the end of the story when she dies beside her love.

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