When was the first prediction of Global Warming? What was predicted and when on how the earth would be now? Was the prediction right?

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carmenwade's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #1)

"From ancient times people suspected that human activity could change the climate."

Even a long time ago people knew that the climate could change (the ice age, etc) and people wanted to know what caused those changes. Natural occurances or was it population and human behavior?

In 1896 a scientist from Sweden had a thought that burning fossil fuels, and therefore releasing corbon dioxide into the air, would make the earth's temperature hotter. We now know that is happening.

coachshera's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #2)

As the Executive Editor of the Sustainable World Sourcebook, I found in my research that there is not complete agreement on predictions now nor in the past. 

I am posting some resources for you. Science Magazine online seems to be the most current up-to-date information regarding global warming prediction and trends.

The most important issue is media that supports and provides education for alternative energy sources and a shift to more sustainable personal ecology practives; i.e., a shift from the consumer-driven attitudes that have placed the majority of post-industrial society in a trance to a new dream that founded on guiding principles and practices that ensure an enviromentally -sustainable, socially just, personally fulfilling presence on this planet now and for future generations.

If you register online with Science Magazine you will have access to top scientific papers on this topic published sincee 1997.   Scientific American is another good resources allowign you to  stay on top of the trends, research , and findings with respect to Global Warming.

April 3, 2006 issue of Time Magazine also has a comprehensive  Special Report on Climate  Change.

HUGG  is a great community to join and be part of the thousands that are creating solutions and taking action on personal, community, national, and international levels.  Good news for a change!


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