What is the main event that happens in Chapter 8 in the book "Warriors Don't Cry"?

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dneshan | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

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The most important and major event that takes place in Chapter 8 occurs in the first half of the chapter after Melba and her family are delivered a note in the middle of the night from President Eisenhower stating that if she is permitted to go back to school the next day, she will be protected.  Given the information in the letter and its source, Melba and her family decide that she will return to school.  Therefore, Melba and the others are escorted into school by the Screaming Eagles, 101st Division.  Melba's day at Central High is the same as previous days but she now has bodyguards and reflects upon her experiences and the reason that the president sent those troops to protect her in her journal entry at the end of the chapter.   

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coolbhl | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) Honors

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School Superintendent Virgil Blossom, who sold integration plan for years, now asked courts to suspend integration. President Eisenhower (Ike) asked Faubus to cooperate with Supreme Court. Saturday, Melba planned to see Vince at wrestling match and see what put white people in charge, but she was forbidden to go. Dangerous to be in public.

Sunday. Ad posted in paper by white man who was ashamed of the bigotry and violence of mob against Elizabeth. Before church, Vince asked Melba to be his girlfriend. Integration postponed, 9 forced to look to each other for company, excluded from their friend’s social activities because it wasn’t safe to have them around. People offered books and tutoring; Dr. Lorch & Grace (protected Elizabeth from mob) tutored. Before court hearing of Faubus, meeting at Mrs. Bates. NAACP state attorney Wiley Branton and Thurgood Marshall (lawyer in Brown case, Chief Counsel of NAACP) present. Faubus’ argument against integration was its accompanying violence. Melba intrigued by reporters, they respected her, made her feel important, answered her questions about the profession. "If I could be a news reporter, I could be in charge of a few things."

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