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What was the intent of the Roosevelt administration's New Deal basically about

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crzydork | Student, Grade 11 | eNotes Newbie

Posted April 29, 2010 at 12:56 PM via web

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What was the intent of the Roosevelt administration's New Deal basically about

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted April 29, 2010 at 7:59 PM (Answer #1)

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The driving intent behind FDR's New Deal was to provide a new framework for the struggling economy of the late 1920s and 1930s.  The focus became on providing relief to millions of Americans, helping to assist recovery of millions of American businesses, and reform to business and economic practices that would serve to prevent such abuses from happening again.  The form of relief came in the form of providing employment opportunities, extension of support from the government, as well as the idea of being able to generate assistance for those that are in need.  At the same time, the reform element helped to drive home business and economic practices that had oversight from the federal government that helped to bolster or strengthen the role of agency monitoring and consumer advocacy in the face of business and industry.

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted April 29, 2010 at 12:59 PM (Answer #2)

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The intent of the New Deal was to get the United States's economy out of the Great Depression.  That was really its only goal.

The thing that made it a "new" deal was that fact that this was the first time that the government had decided that it needed to help ensure that the people were able to get by -- that they would not be too poor.

Up until this point, the government pretty much just kept out of the way and let the economy do its own thing.  But now, FDR decided that there should be a new deal -- one where people could expect that the government would help to protect them from hard times.

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