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What values, beliefs, and views are stated or implied in Reynold Spector’s article...

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ashifs | Student, Undergraduate | Honors

Posted May 1, 2011 at 4:52 AM via web

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What values, beliefs, and views are stated or implied in Reynold Spector’s article “Science and Pseudoscience in Adult Nutrition Research and Practice”?

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vangoghfan | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted January 11, 2012 at 12:39 PM (Answer #1)

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A variety of values, beliefs, and views are stated or implied in Reynold Spector’s article “Science and Pseudoscience in Adult Nutrition Research and Practice,” including the following:

  • Nutritionists have an obligation to be as rigorously scientific as possible.
  • Many publications dealing with nutrition are not rigorously scientific.
  • The only reliable way of discovering truth in the sciences is to use the scientific method.
  • Nutritionists often make unsupported claims.
  • The human body itself often does very well at keeping its nutritional needs balanced without much need for nutritional supplements, especially megadoses of vitamins.
  • Diets designed to reduce weight have not been shown to be especially effective.
  • Many of the current participants in the field of nutrition (such as academics and the editors of journals) benefit in various ways from the often lax standards in the field.
  • Many people who depend upon sound nutritional knowledge (such as consumers, patients, and doctors) are often harmed by the unsupported claims made my many nutritionists.
  • People in the field of nutrition have an ethical obligation to follow the scientific method.
  • In short,

as Socrates pointed out, the big question is: How should one live one’s life? To decide, one needs good data! In terms of nutritional advice:

  1. Demand scientific studies.
  2. Follow the FDA criterion: only follow nutritional advice if proven to be safe and effective.
  3. View the nutritional advice of “experts,” like those who prepared the agriculture department’s original food pyramid1 and the newer food pyramids,6 with a hypercritical eye. Their track record is poor.

 

 

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