What are two personal qualities Granny values and possesses?

2 Answers | Add Yours

cmcqueeney's profile pic

cmcqueeney | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted on

Two other qualities that Granny values highly are a sense of order and he independence.  Granny has worked hard for years to keep her life in order.  She talks about the shelves being ordered and life being spread out and neatly tucked in around the edges.  This order gives her a sense of control.  It's important in the story because when she begins to remember the jilting and when she realizes she is dying, she is suddenly not in control and she can't handle it.  Ordering her life up until this point had given her the control she needed to physically, mentally, and emotionally survive the difficult life she had.

Granny also values her independence - and this goes hand in hand with her sense of order.  She raised the children on her own, she took care of the farm, she took care of sick children and sick animals - she's done it all.  She feels like these things are her 'badges of honor' to prove to her husband and to the man who jilted her that she was ok.  She also shows her independence when she says she isn't worried about dying and doesn't need the priest because she has a special arrangement with the saints.  She feels she has set everything up for her death on her own and she thinks she will be fine.  Sadly, she finds out otherwise when she dies.

dymatsuoka's profile pic

dymatsuoka | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Granny values hard work.  She remembers "all the food she had cooked, and all the clothes she had cut and sewed, and all the gardens she had made...she had fenced in a hundred acres once, digging the post holes herself and clamping the wires with just a negro boy to help".  Looking back at all the work she did gives her a sense of pride, and she says, "Well, I didn't do so badly, did I?"

She is also a mother-figure and nurturer.  She raised four children who seek her advice even in their adulthood, and she recalls "riding country roads...when women had their babies...sitting up nights with sick horses and sick negroes and sick children and hardly ever losing one."

We’ve answered 318,006 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question