What are three significant things we learn about the Cratchits in A Christmas Carol?

2 Answers | Add Yours

pmiranda2857's profile pic

pmiranda2857 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

In the story, the reader learns that although the Cratchit family is poor, struggles to make ends meet financially, they are a loving family.  They have a very close family, there is a warmth, rich with joy among the members of the family.  This is what really sustains them, along with their strong faith in God. 

The Cratchits are good, Christian people, who won't speak ill of Mr. Scrooge, even though he is a miserly, stingy, cruel man.  They wish him well, drink to his health and as the founder of the feast.  He is respected in the Cratchit home, no one else respects Mr. Scrooge outside of Fred his nephew.

We also learn that the Cratchits are struggling to keep their young son, Tiny Tim alive in the presence of his serious illness, without money to treat Tiny Tim, inevitably, he will die.    

mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

While the poor of Charles Dickens London were thought to be worthless and dull, the Crachits prove themselves spirited, caring, and fun-loving tightly -knit family despite their penury. For, as the Spirit of Christmas Present hovers over the home of the Crachits, Scrooge witnesses a happy, although pitiable, family.

As Bob Crachit heads home from his chair at the office of Ebenezer Scrooge, his daughter Martha returns at a late hour. Her mother kisses her repeatedly, urging her to warm herself by the fire; however her young siblings want Martha to hide in order to tease Bob Crachit. After she does so, tricking her father, Martha is troubled to have caused him anxiety, so she makes herself known. And, as the others surround him in glee, Mrs. Crachit asks him how well Tiny Tim has fared this day. Bob Crachit replies that Tim has done well because in his unselfish, caring nature, Tim has hoped that the people in the church will see him so that they will

...remember upon Christmas Day who made lame beggars walk and blind men see."

After their meal, Mr. Crachit offers a toast to Scrooge, "the Founder of the Feast," a toast which raises the ire of Mrs. Crachit. Still, she toasts him out of consideration for her husband.


We’ve answered 317,286 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question