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 What are three epic convenctions  in the movie or book The Lord of the Rings that...

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coolbhl | Student, Undergraduate | Honors

Posted January 6, 2010 at 4:07 AM via web

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 What are three epic convenctions  in the movie or book The Lord of the Rings that can be found in The Odyssey.

What are three epic convenctions  in the movie or book The Lord of the Rings that can be found in The Odyssey.

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James Kelley | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted January 6, 2010 at 7:17 AM (Answer #2)

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The first convention would probably be the focus on the actions of the hero against the backdrop of important historical events. The hero's actions, at least in part, shape the outcome of these events.

One Internet source (http://english.tjc.edu/greekromanepic/conventions.htm) cites a number of other conventions that might apply:

Epithet: The hobbit Frodo is called by other names, such as The Ring Bearer.

Long and formal speeches by characters

Gods (or wizards and the evil disembodied force of Sauron, who are all clearly more than human) intervene

Vast settings

Values of civilizations

On a side note, I think it might make more sense to compare The Lord of the Rings to the Germanic epic Beowulf. There's nothing wrong with making the comparison to The Odyssey, but Tolkien was clearly influenced by the Germanic tale.

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readerofbooks | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted January 6, 2010 at 8:16 AM (Answer #3)

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There are many epic conventions found in both, since you ask for three, I will try to think of the best ones.

First, there is the idea of a voyage that is plagued with difficulties. Just as Odysseus had to travel to get home, Frodo and Sam had a voyage. To be sure, Frodo and Sam's voyage was not to home, but it was to save their homes. Second, there is obvious element of warfare. No epic is complete without tons of battles and destruction. Third, there is the element of the gods or superhuman powers that are in place.

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epollock | Valedictorian

Posted January 6, 2010 at 6:16 PM (Answer #4)

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There are many epic conventions that are similar. the first one is the invocation. Someone is always invoking the name of a god or spirit to lend assistance. The other is a hero takes a journey. The third is a battle between good and evil with good winning in the end.

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coolbhl | Student, Undergraduate | Honors

Posted January 7, 2010 at 4:01 AM (Answer #5)

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There are many epic conventions that are similar. the first one is the invocation. Someone is always invoking the name of a god or spirit to lend assistance. The other is a hero takes a journey. The third is a battle between good and evil with good winning in the end.

So a good them for both would be good vs. evil.

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marioulitoula | Student, Undergraduate | eNoter

Posted January 24, 2010 at 7:47 AM (Answer #6)

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It could also be that as in Odysseus' case, the fellowship goes on a long difficult journey with no certain results cause no one could guarantee that Frodo would manage to make it to Mordor and destroy the Ring!Plus not even Odysseus could be sure whether he would make it to Ithaka.                          Moreover as it seems in Odysseus case, in the end, it's not so much about making it to the destination but about the journey itself.What you experienced in your trip(either a spiritual or a physical one),what you've learnt and how this has altered yourself.

Finally along with the Gods, witches, magical creatures that add in both cases to the supernatural element, both Odysseus and the Fellowship are constantly challenged as their trip is full of obstacles, and during this time they have many cases when they are given the choice to give up or go the "easy way"(Odysseus could stay with Kirki the witch,Frodo could keep the ring for himself,Aragorn could deny his destiny as a King).So in the end it comes down to how everyone carries his burden and tries to overcome his own self in order to do the rigth thingn no matter how difficult that might be(Frodo alone has to destroy the ring,Odysseus must master its crew to get them back to Ithaca).

Hope I helped you...

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marioulitoula | Student, Undergraduate | eNoter

Posted January 25, 2010 at 8:55 AM (Answer #7)

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It could also be that as in Odysseus' case, the fellowship goes on a long difficult journey with no certain results cause no one could guarantee that Frodo would manage to make it to Mordor and destroy the Ring!Plus not even Odysseus could be sure whether he would make it to Ithaka.                          Moreover as it seems in Odysseus case, in the end, it's not so much about making it to the destination but about the journey itself.What you experienced in your trip(either a spiritual or a physical one),what you've learnt and how this has altered yourself.

Finally along with the Gods, witches, magical creatures that add in both cases to the supernatural element, both Odysseus and the Fellowship are constantly challenged as their trip is full of obstacles, and during this time they have many cases when they are given the choice to give up or go the "easy way"(Odysseus could stay with Kirki the witch,Frodo could keep the ring for himself,Aragorn could deny his destiny as a King).So in the end it comes down to how everyone carries his burden and tries to overcome his own self in order to do the rigth thingn no matter how difficult that might be(Frodo alone has to destroy the ring,Odysseus must master its crew to get them back to Ithaca).

Hope I helped you...

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