What is the theme of this book?  What are the insights of about life as the author expresses

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jceleste | eNotes Newbie

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I did not post this question correctly what is the theme of the book The Prince and Pauper


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loveisalluneed | eNotes Newbie

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I agree that prince and the paupers theme was kinda out in the open the theme is that if poor or rich both are humans but still judged but if u get to know the persenalty of each person then that's when u decide if they are rich or poor.

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iklan100 | College Teacher | (Level 1) Valedictorian

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I think that the theme of ''The Prince and the Pauper'' is very simple indeed-- that it doesnt matter if youre born a prince or a pauper, underneath the externals we are all the same and given the opportunity, a pauper can be as good (or even better than) a prince.

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etotheeyepi | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted on

I really have no idea, but since no one else as answered this I will give it a go.

The prince is the son of King Henry VIII. The pauper is a boy born in Offal Court in London. They accidentally switch places. The prince lives for a while as a commoner, and the pauper lives for a while as a prince, the heir to the throne of England.

The prince protests loudly that he is really a prince, but no one believes him. The pauper complains although maybe no as loudly as the prince, but if I remember correctly, his complaints also fall on deaf ears.

When the prince and the pauper find each other at the pauper's coronation as king, officials realize that they are about to make a major mistake, and all is made right when the prince and the pauper again switch places.

So what would the theme be? The pauper dressed as a prince is treated as a prince. The prince dressed as a pauper is treated as a pauper. So, the theme might be that clothes make the man. Or don't judge a book by its cover. Or man reads the face; God reads the soul. Or there is the line in Macbeth, spoken by Duncan about the Thane of Cawdor, which says something similar about how a man's character is not visible on his appearance.  I suppose that the theme could be something sinister like, knowledge is impossible by observation.

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