What is the theme of "A Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost?

3 Answers | Add Yours

bigdreams1's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #1)

The theme of this poem centers around choices, and which ones bring us the fullest life as human beings.

In "The Road Not Taken," we see someone in the woods at the fork in the road...pondering which way would be the better one to travel.

The one path is one he has traveled before...so it would be safe, and easy to travel. The other path is unknown, and will be scary to travel because there will be more obstales in the way. The author chooses to take "the road less traveled", and he concludes that this has made "all the difference."

We assume then, that the moral or theme of the poem is that choosing individuality...stepping out of the comfort zone and being a nonconformist...following ones own heart and dreams...is what makes life full and rich.

luv2teachu's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #2)

Themes Individualism .......The speaker chooses to go his own way, taking the “road less traveled” (line 19). Caution .......Before deciding to take the "road less traveled" (line 19), the speaker takes time to consider the other road. He says, "[L]ong I stood / And looked down one as far as I could" (lines 3-4). Commitment .......The speaker does not have second thoughts after making his decision. Accepting a Challenge .......It may be that the road the speaker chooses is less traveled because it presents trials or perils. Such challenges seem to appeal to the speaker. .
ankita009's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #3)

one of the attractions of the poem is archetypal dilemma, one that we instatly recognize becaude each of us encounters it innumerable times, both literally and figuratively. Paths in the woods and forks in the raods are ancient and deep seated metaphors for the lifeline, its crises and decisions. we are free to choose but we do not know beforehand what we are choosing between, our route is thus determined by an acceration of choice and chance, and it is impossible to separate the two.

We’ve answered 288,456 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question