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What are some literary devices found in chapter 15 of Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird?

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Niall_77 | eNotes Newbie

Posted August 24, 2013 at 5:57 PM via web

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What are some literary devices found in chapter 15 of Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird?

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literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted August 24, 2013 at 6:53 PM (Answer #1)

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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird contains many different literary (or poetic/rhetorical) devices. 

Dialect- Dialect refers to the choice of language an author decides to use. Since the novel takes place in the south, the dialogue of the characters depicts a truly southern tongue. For example, when Mr. Tate tells Atticus that he "don't look for any trouble," the dialogue illustrates a southern way of speaking. He (Tate) goes on to remind Atticus about how the town folk get when they are "shinnied up." 

Simile- A simile is a comparison between two typically unlike things. The comparison uses either "like" or "as" to make the comparison. The first paragraph of chapter fifteen contains a simile. It appears where Scout, as the narrator, compares Boo to an ant ("he’d follow it, like an ant)."

Direct Characterization- Direct characterization is where the author provides a direct reference to how (or who) a character is. IN chapter fifteen, Scout offers readers a little more on Atticus. Atticus never ate dessert, and he walked everywhere in Maycomb (which contradicted the thought that a man walking with no purpose meant his mind was "incapable of purpose"). 

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