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What are some examples of segregation in To Kill a Mockingbird? Please include the...

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citytech | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted February 8, 2012 at 9:16 AM via web

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What are some examples of segregation in To Kill a Mockingbird? Please include the chapter and page number, and if possible, quotes.

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted February 8, 2012 at 9:57 AM (Answer #1)

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EXAMPLES OF SEGREGATION IN TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

The Quarters.  The African American population of Maycomb is located in the area known as the Quarters "outside the southern town limits (Chapter 12)."

Churches.  Blacks and whites attend separate churches: The Finch family are Methodists, while Miss Maudie and the Radleys are Baptists. Calpurnia attends First Purchase AME Church in the Quarters, and the white faces of the Finch children are a surprise to at least one member of the congregation when Jem and Scout accompany Cal one Sunday. According to Lula,

"You ain't got no business bringin' white chillun here--they got their church, we got our'n (Chapter 12)."

The Jury.  Tom Robinson's jury is segregated in two ways: They are all-white and all-men.

"Miss Maudie can't serve on a jury because she's a woman-- (Chapter 23)."

The Courtroom.  Blacks and white had separate seating areas in the Maycomb County Court House: Whites sat on the ground floor, while blacks sat in the balcony. Additionally, blacks had to wait until all white people had entered before they could join the others.

     The Negroes, having waited for the white people... began to come in. "Whoa now, just a minute," said a club member, holding up his walking stick. "Just don't start up them there steps yet awhile (Chapter 16)."

Women.  When the group congregates in front of Atticus's house to discuss the move of Tom Robinson to the jail, there are no women present--only men. Women were not usually included in talk about politics.

Scout.  At the Christmas dinner at Finch's Landing, Scout is segregated from the rest of the family. Jem and Francis are allowed to sit with the adults but apparently Aunt Alexandra believes that Scout might "get up and throw something (Chapter 9)."

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