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What are some examples of imagery in part I of the novel "Siddhartha" by Herman Hesse?

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megan-westerf... | (Level 1) Salutatorian

Posted September 9, 2012 at 11:59 PM via web

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What are some examples of imagery in part I of the novel "Siddhartha" by Herman Hesse?

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portd | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted September 21, 2012 at 8:30 PM (Answer #1)

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One example of imagery in the novel "Siddhartha" by the writer Herman Hesse is "shade poured into his black eyes." Here the reader immediately can see the darkness of the eyes and the other darkness that is being absorbed by the eyes.

Another example of imagery in part 1 of this story is "the luminous 
forehead, with the eye of a king, with his slim hips." The reader can easily visualize the boy's facial complexion, the power of his eye, and his slender features. 

A third example of imagery in the first section is "the bluish shade of the grove." Here, the reader can see in their mind's eye a different hue of the shade in a peaceful agricultural setting.

Furthermore, an example of imagery also includes "he turned pale like a dry banana-skin." With this line, the reader can see that Govinda is in some distress. A clear mental picture of his demeanor results from this descriptive line.

Moreover, another example of imagery is "moonlight reflecting from his bare shins." The reader gets a picture of Siddhartha's shins and their brightness from an intense moonlight that is actually reflecting back at the observer, Siddhartha's father. Therefore part 1 has imagery that gives a vividness to the story early on and sets a mood for the story in conjunction with other literary devices. These devices help draw the reader into the story; they hold readers' interests and help them experience the novel better. The novel is richer to readers' because of effective imagery and other literary elements.

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