What is the rising action and inciting incident in Animal Farm?  

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ms-mcgregor's profile pic

ms-mcgregor | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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The rising action occurs in Chapter 1 when Old Major gives his speech which will later be turned into the philosophy of Animalism. The animals prepare for rebellion and it comes much sooner than they had thought. The inciting incident occurs when Jones gets drunk and forgets to feed the animals. They break into the barn and help themselves to food. Jones and his men arrive with whips to get control of the animals but they drive off the humans and then gather all the tools men use to control them
( whips, nose rings, chains, etc) and burn them. They rename the farm "Animal Farm" and decide to rule themselves.

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teachersage | (Level 2) Educator

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The Manor Farm becomes Animal Farm when the animals spontaneously rebel against Farmer Jones and his men. The inciting incident that leads to the rebellion comes when Farmer Jones and his men try to whip the animals away from the storage bin of grain they are eating. The animals, already upset at not having been fed, turn on the men and attack them. They drive the humans off the farm and take over, renaming it Animal Farm. They decide to run it themselves.

The rising events that lead to the rebellion have been building since the beginning of the book. From the very first line, when we learn that Farmer Jones was too drunk when he was tending the hens to shut their popholes and that he went lurching across the yard back to his house, we know the animals are not getting proper care. After that, we hear Old Major's speech, weaving a golden vision for the animals of a time when they will be freed of human tyranny and run their lives for their own benefit. Finally, when the neglect of Farmer Jones and his men causes the animals to go hungry, the build up of pressure has become so great that all it takes is Farmer Jones and his men coming in with whips to light the spark of rebellion. 


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