What is the result of Victor and the Monster's alienation from society?

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Both Victor and his monster face alienation in Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein. This being said, neither face alienation for the same reason, or have the same results.

Victor faces alienation which he has brought upon himself. Victor, obsessed by the desire to reanimate life, has alienated all--friends, family, and society itself. As a result of this alienation, he unleashes a monster upon society. As well as this, Victor finds himself unable to relate to the monster he has created. When the monster comes to him asking for a mate, Victor cannot find the empathy which the monster needs. Instead, Victor has become harsh and heartless.

The monster, on the other hand, faces alienation brought upon him by both Victor and society. The monster is alienated by Victor because he cannot bear to look at the monster he has created. Upon looking at the face of his creation Victor runs. It is not until the monster looks upon him that he realizes what he has done.

While the monster holds no fault for his creation, he also holds no fault for his alienation by the society around him. The monster's physical appearance frightens and horrifies those around him. He is literally regarded as a monster.

The result of the monster's alienation is, in part, his fault. The monster, because of the murderous path he choose, becomes the monster all accused him of being. That being said, because of this, the monster realizes that he has no true place in society. The result of the monster's alienation, therefore, is that he must remove himself from society.

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